Problem Oriented Policing

Problem Oriented Policing - 139 © 2010 American Society of...

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Unformatted text preview: 139 © 2010 American Society of Criminology Criminology & Public Policy • Volume 9 • Issue 1 Research Article P R O B L E M - O R I E N T E D P O L I C I N G Is problem-oriented policing effective in reducing crime and disorder? Findings from a Campbell systematic review David Weisburd H e b r e w U n i v e r s i t y G e o r g e M a s o n U n i v e r s i t y Cody W. Telep G e o r g e M a s o n U n i v e r s i t y Joshua C. Hinkle G e o r g i a S t a t e U n i v e r s i t y John E. Eck U n i v e r s i t y o f C i n c i n n a t i Research Summary We conducted a Campbell systematic review to examine the effectiveness of problem-oriented policing (POP) in reducing crime and disorder. After an exhaustive search strategy that identified more than 5,500 articles and reports, we found only ten methodologically rigor- ous evaluations that met our inclusion criteria. Using meta-analytic techniques, we found an overall modest but statistically significant impact of POP on crime and disorder. We also report on our analysis of pre/post comparison studies. Although these studies are less This project was supported by Award 2007-IJ-CX-0045, awarded by the National Institute of Justice, OFce of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice and the Nordic Campbell Centre. The opinions, ¡ndings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the authors and do not necessarily re¢ect those of the Department of Justice or the Nordic Campbell Centre. We would like to thank David B. Wilson for his assistance with our e£ect size calculations and his comments on an earlier version of this article, Lorraine Green Mazerolle and Anthony A. Braga for data from their systematic reviews, and Charlotte Gill and the anonymous reviewers from the Campbell Collaboration and those from Criminology & Public Policy for their helpful comments. Direct correspondence to David Weisburd, Administration of Justice Department, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, MS 4¤4, Manassas, VA 20110 (e-mail: [email protected]); Cody W. Telep, Administration of Justice Department, George Mason University, 10900 University Boulevard, MS 4¤4, Manassas, VA 20100 (e-mail: [email protected]); Joshua C. Hinkle, Georgia State University, Department of Criminal Justice, PO Box 4818, Atlanta, GA 32302 (e-mail: [email protected]); John E. Eck, University of Cincinnati, Department of Criminal Justice, PO Box 210389, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (e-mail: [email protected]). Criminology & Public Policy 140 methodologically rigorous, they are more numerous. The results of these studies indicate an overwhelmingly positive impact from POP. Policy Implications POP has been adopted widely across police agencies and has been identified as effective by many policing scholars. Our study supports the overall commitment of police to POP but suggests that we should not necessarily expect large crime and disorder control benefits from this approach. Moreover, funders and the police need to invest much greater effort and this approach....
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Problem Oriented Policing - 139 © 2010 American Society of...

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