Lecture 11-Community Oriented Policing

Lecture 11-Community Oriented Policing - Lecture 11-...

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Lecture 11- Community-Oriented Policing - The 1980s to present have seen an unprecedented period of innovations in policing -Changes have involved big things such as attempts to redefine the role of police -To smaller things such as new strategies to target patrol, or supervise officers -One of the first and biggest shifts that happened during this period was the spread of Community-Oriented Policing Reasons for Spread of Community-Oriented Policing 1. Times were ripe for change for the reasons we’ve talked about repeatedly -Police were faced with a community relations crisis distrust of government power after the turbulent 1960s and 1970s -Research showed their standard tactics weren’t effective -Crime rates were rising 2. 3. Experts began to recognize the crucial role citizens played as co-producers of police services -Police depend on citizens to report crime to them and request help in dealing with disorder -Decision to arrest or not often influenced by the preference of the victim -Apprehension often depends on cooperation of citizens (victims, witnesses etc.), as does successful prosecution 4. 1
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-What is Community-Oriented Policing? -COP is a very difficult concept to define -As the book notes, the COP label has been attached to a very wide variety of activities and programs -Different people, different police agencies etc. have different definitions of COP -The real issue is that COP isn’t a police strategy or tactic like random patrol or hot spots patrol etc. -COP is really a paradigm of policing—a new idea about how to do policing, how police agencies should be organized, what the goal of the police should be etc. -rather than any specific tactic -In a perfect world, community policing would be defined something like the following: Community Policing: -And a key change related to this, is moving to being proactive rather than Reactive -Cops are doing this community work to try to prevent crime before it happens. -But it’s not a perfect world -In practice community policing doesn’t often resemble all of that above in practice, hence why it’s hard to define universally -But Bayley (1998) noted 4 elements that tend to emerge in places that implemented COP with some level of success 4 elements that emerge when COP isimplemented 1. Community-based crime control 2. 3. Public participation in planning and supervision 4. 2
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-Before getting into implementation issues, let’s start by talking about what COP aims to change in police departments -In general, COP reform efforts have been aimed at 3 targets: 1. Community Partnerships 2. Organizational Change 3. Problem Solving A . Community Partnerships -COP’s foundation is based on the assumption that a more productive way for the police to fight crime is through a collaborative relationship with the community -Help improve relationships with community -Give police better access to information about crime and other problems in the community -In turn, police can then be more responsive to community’s needs -There are two main categories of community partnerships— Consultation and Mobilization
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Lecture 11-Community Oriented Policing - Lecture 11-...

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