human development 11 18

human development 11 18 - Description of self vs. worth or...

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Unformatted text preview: Description of self vs. worth or value of self baseon on description SELF CONCEPT- SELF ESTEEM SELF CONCEPT VS. SELF ESTEEM Concept: concept a person has of him/herself Presents how one thinks about oneself How one percieves self Judgements of attricbutes within descrete domains (e.g.,cognitive compretence,social,accpetance,physical,appearance,etc.) ESTEEM: limited to an evaultaive componento of self-concept Global self evaluations Overall evaulation of ones worth or value as a persons Tapped y a set of criteria that explicity asks about ones percieved worth as a person NOT a summary PIERS-HARRIS self concept sclae: FACTORS/TEMS 1.behavioral adjustement Admissions SELF-CONCEPT vs. SELF-ESTEEM self-concept...self-esteem self-description self-evaluation categorized by specific domains overall sense of worth categorical vs. psychological selves real vs. ideal selves Two constituents of self: I vs. me I-self: self as subject actor or knower subject who does the knowing or the thinking constituent of the self that interprets events, people, and thingsdetermines the very meaning of life events, providing itself even with a perspective to itself I can reflect upon itself, is aware of its own awareness and can organize and interpret experience I think, act, and know about Me-self: self as object, object of ones knowingthe object of thought what is known of the self I reflect upon me . I know about me . I think, act, know about me . Early Childhood self is very concrete and physical dwell on observables use of global terms Early Childhood categorical preferences no generalization possessions demonstrations disjointed all positive Im 3 years old and I live in a big house with my mother and father and my brother, Jason, and my sister, Lisa. I have blue eyes and a kitty that is orange and a television set in my own room. I know all of my ABCs , listen : A, B, C, D, E, F, H, J, L, K, O, M, P, Q, X, Z. I can run real fast. I like pizza and I have a nice teacher at preschool . I can count up to 100 , want to hear me? I love my dog Skipper . I can climb to the top of the jungle gym, Im not scared. Im never scared! Im always happy. I have brown hair and I go to preschool. Im really strong. I can lift this chair, watch me! Middle Childhood begin to define self as part of social units begin to form social identity better able to infer and describe their enduring inner qualities describe self using personality terms talk about abilities as they compare to peers (social comparisons) Middle Childhood tend to describe competencies peers becoming more important (self-attributes more interpersonal) use of higher order concepts beginning of an overall evaluation (both positive and negative) Im in fourth grade this year, and Im pretty popular...
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2011 for the course DFST 1013 taught by Professor Fields-moore during the Fall '08 term at North Texas.

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human development 11 18 - Description of self vs. worth or...

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