IACP_School_Violence - Bureau of Justice Assistance U.S Department of Justice Guide for Preventing and Responding to School Violence 2 n d E d i t

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Unformatted text preview: Bureau of Justice Assistance U.S. Department of Justice Guide for Preventing and Responding to School Violence 2 n d E d i t i o n This publication was supported by Grant No. 2007-DD-BX-K112 awarded by the Bureau of Justice Assistance. The Bureau of Justice Assistance is a component of the Office of Justice Programs, which also includes the Bureau of Justice Statistics, the National Institute of Justice, the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, and the Office for Victims of Crime. Points of view or opinions in this document are those of the author and do not represent the official position or policies of the United States Department of Justice. Guide for Preventing and Responding to School Violence Second Edition i International Association of Chiefs of Police I nternatIonal a ssocIatIon of c hIefs of P olIce Founded in 1893, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) is the world’s oldest and largest association of law enforcement executives, representing over 22,000 members in 100 countries. The goals of the IACP are to advance the science and art of police services; to develop and disseminate improved administrative, technical and operational practices and promote their use in police work; to foster police cooperation and the exchange of information and experience among police administrators throughout the world; to bring about recruitment and training in the police profession of qualified persons; and to encourage adherence of all police officers to high professional standards of performance and conduct. A core strength of the IACP is the unity with which it speaks on behalf of its members and the law enforcement profession. In an effort towards inclusiveness and brevity in addressing the broad scope of the police family, the following demographics are implied and considered when the phrase, “state, local and tribal” or “law enforcement” is employed. University and college; state and provincial; municipal; county; federal; Indian Country; public transit; marine; railroad; environmental; military; park police; capitol police; the various special investigative branches of prosecutorial agencies; and any legislatively authorized duly sworn and certified law enforcement agency. Since 1893, the International Association of Chiefs of Police has been serving the needs of the law enforcement community. Throughout those past 100-plus years, the IACP has been launching historically acclaimed programs, conducting ground- breaking research and providing exemplary programs and services to our membership around the globe. Professionally recognized programs such as the FBI Identification Division and the Uniform Crime Reporting Program can trace their origins back to the IACP. From spearheading national use of fingerprint identification to partnering in a consortium on community policing to gathering top experts in criminal justice, the government, and education for summits on violence, homicide, and youth violence, the IACP has realized its responsibility to achieve the goals of law enforcement. ii...
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This note was uploaded on 02/01/2011 for the course CRJU 4230 taught by Professor Derekallen during the Spring '10 term at Georgia State University, Atlanta.

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IACP_School_Violence - Bureau of Justice Assistance U.S Department of Justice Guide for Preventing and Responding to School Violence 2 n d E d i t

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