MITBch18

MITBch18 - CHAPTER 18 1LIMITING MARKET POWER: REGULATION...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
C HAPTER 18 1L IMITING M ARKET P OWER : R EGULATION AND A NTITRUST TRUE-FALSE QUESTIONS THE PUBLIC INTEREST ISSUE: MONOPOLY POWER VERSUS MERE SIZE 1. The goal of all regulation is the creation of perfectly competitive markets. ANSWER: F, E, R 2. High prices redistribute wealth from consumers to firms. ANSWER: T, E, A 3. Firms with monopoly power tend to be more efficient than competitive firms. ANSWER: F, E, A 4. All large firms have monopoly power. ANSWER: F, E, R P ART 1: R EGULATION WHAT IS REGULATION AND WHO REGULATES WHAT? 5. Regulation began in the United States in the 1950s. ANSWER: F, E, R 6. Many regulatory agencies were formed in the 1930s under President Franklin D. Roosevelt. ANSWER: T, E, R 7. Regulation of industry is usually carried out by special government agencies that administer and  interpret the law. ANSWER: T, M, R 8. The main instrument of control of public monopolies is the regulatory agency. ANSWER: T, E, R 9. Powers of many regulatory agencies are designed to protect public health and safety. ANSWER: T, E, A 10. Many industries are regulated in the United States, from railroads and electric utilities to cable TV. ANSWER: T, M, R 11. Many regulated industries are not pure monopolies. ANSWER: T, E, A 21
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
22 Chapter 18/Limiting Market Power: Regulation and Antitrust SOME OBJECTIVES OF REGULATION 12. Economies of scale and scope encourage free competition. ANSWER: F, E, A 13. Economies of scope are present when a bank also sells insurance and provides brokerage services  for stocks and bonds. ANSWER: T, M, A 14. The concept of economies of scope describes the savings acquired from simultaneous production of  different products. ANSWER: T, M, R 15. Economies of scale tend to create natural monopolies. ANSWER: T, E, A 16. The overhead power lines owned by an electric company are an example of a bottleneck facility. ANSWER: T, M, A 17. The parity-pricing principle helps determine the price that a firm should charge its competitors for  the use of its resources. ANSWER: T, M, R 18. Universal service  means that one company provides service to all consumers, everywhere. ANSWER: F, E, R 19. The “universal service” argument often requires that some products be sold at a loss while other  products be sold at profits higher than normal. ANSWER: T, M, R 20. Cross-subsidization  implies that a loss from one product’s sales will be made up by the profit from  another product’s sales. ANSWER: T, M, A
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 27

MITBch18 - CHAPTER 18 1LIMITING MARKET POWER: REGULATION...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online