Ch19 Article 3 - Managing Theory & Practice: For...

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Page 1 of 2 2009 Factiva, Inc. All rights reserved. Managing By Sarah E. Needleman 812 words 3 August 2009 The Wall Street Journal J B6 English A growing number of businesses are tracking social-media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter to gauge consumer sentiment and avert potential public-relations problems. Ford Motor Co., PepsiCo Inc. and Southwest Airlines Co., among others, are deploying software and assigning employees to monitor Internet postings and blogs. They're also assigning senior leaders to craft corporate strategies for social media. One morning last December, Scott Monty, Ford's head of social media, saw Twitter messages alerting him to online comments criticizing Ford for allegedly trying to shut a fan Web site, TheRangerStation.com. The dispute prompted about 1,000 email complaints to Ford overnight. Mr. Monty, who joined Ford the previous July from an advisory firm specializing in social media, didn't wait to learn the facts. He posted messages on his Twitter page, and Ford's, saying he was looking into the matter, adding frequent updates. Within hours, he reported that Ford's lawyers believed the site was selling counterfeit goods with Ford's logo.
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This note was uploaded on 01/26/2011 for the course MKT 337h taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Ch19 Article 3 - Managing Theory & Practice: For...

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