Intelligence

Intelligence - I Cognition a Mental activity for organizing...

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I. Cognition a. Mental activity for organizing understanding and communicating II. Intelligence (in all cultures) a. Ability to i. Learn from experience ii. Acquire knowledge iii. Adapt to new situations III. Spearman (1863-1945) a. “g factor” (general ) i. The ability to reason and solve problems ii. “g” underlies intelligent behavior b. “s factor” (specific) i. The ability to excel in certain areas ii. “Specific intelligence” c. Factor analysis i. Used to identify clusters of test items measuring a common ability IV.Thurstone: Clusters of Primary Mental Abilities a. Word Fluency b. Verbal Comprehension c. Spatial Ability d. Perceptual Speed e. Numerical Ability f. Inductive Reasoning g. Memory i. IQ Test V. Howard Gardner a. Multiple Intelligences i. Intelligence comes in multiple forms ii. Not everyone can be intelligent in every way iii. Can’t measure it in one way b. Savant syndrome i. Unbalanced abilities, but a few extremely advanaced abilities c. Types of Intelligences i. Verbal/Linguistics 1. Skilled at acquiring language
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2011 for the course PSY 0010 taught by Professor Joshuafetterman during the Spring '08 term at Pittsburgh.

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Intelligence - I Cognition a Mental activity for organizing...

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