Week 3 disscussion 1

Week 3 disscussion 1 - Week 3 Disscusion 1 e How are...

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Week 3 Disscusion 1 e How are decisions made in your organization (or an organization with which you are familiar)? An effective executive does not need to be a leader in the sense that the term is now most commonly used. Harry Truman did not have one ounce of charisma, for example, yet he was among the most effective chief executives in U.S. history. Similarly, some of the best business and nonprofit CEOs I've worked with over a sixty-five-year consulting career were not stereotypical leaders. They were all over the map in terms of their personalities, attitudes, values, strengths, and weaknesses. They ranged from extroverted to nearly reclusive, from easygoing to controlling, from generous to parsimonious. What made them all effective is that they followed the same eight practices: They asked, "What needs to be done?" They asked, "What is right for the enterprise?" They developed action plans. They took responsibility for decisions. They took responsibility for communicating. They were focused on opportunities rather than problems. They ran productive meetings. They thought and said "we" rather than "I." The first two practices gave them the knowledge they needed. The next four helped them convert this knowledge into effective action. The last two ensured that the whole organization felt responsible and accountable. […] Act When they translate plans into action, executives need to pay particular attention to decision making, communication, opportunities (as opposed to problems), and meetings. […] Take responsibility for decisions. A decision has not been made until people know: the name of the person accountable for carrying it out; the deadline; the names of the people who will be affected by the decision and therefore have to know about, understand, and approve it—or at least not be strongly opposed to it —and the names of the people who have to be informed of the decision, even if they are not directly affected by it.
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An extraordinary number of organizational decisions run into trouble because these bases aren't covered. One of my clients, thirty years ago, lost its leadership position in the fast- growing Japanese market because the company, after deciding to enter into a joint venture with a new Japanese partner, never made clear who was to inform the purchasing agents that the partner defined its specifications in meters and kilograms rather than feet and pounds—and nobody ever did relay that information. It's just as important to review decisions periodically—at a time that's been agreed on in advance—as it is to make them carefully in the first place. That way, a poor decision can be corrected before it does real damage. These reviews can cover anything from the results to the assumptions underlying the decision. Such a review is especially important for the most crucial and most difficult of all
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2011 for the course MGT 330 taught by Professor Debbieharris during the Spring '10 term at Ashford University.

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Week 3 disscussion 1 - Week 3 Disscusion 1 e How are...

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