15 Faraday's Law

15 Faraday's Law - Lecture 17 Faradays Law Recalling the...

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Lecture 17 Faraday’s Law Recalling the iron rod experiment and the levitating ring, we saw that the field interacts with the ring producing an induced current flowing through it. The current opposes the change in flux. Faraday’s Law can be stated hence as follows: A voltage is induced in the coil equal in magnitude to d dt Φ , with a polarity such that it opposes the change of flux. In Figure 1 e is the induced voltage. The current is clockwise so that it would generate a flux (by the right hand rule) that opposes Φ (t). The induced voltage source and the resistance of the ring are distributed along the coil as depicted in the picture. The sum of all of these fictitious distributed V-sources adds to d dt Φ . Figure 1 - Faraday's Law If we connect several coils instead of one (as if the ring were made of several loops) the flux Φ (t) links all N turns and the induced voltage across the N turns is d eN dt Φ = This is depicted in Figure 2 .
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Figure 2 - Induced voltage and current.
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2011 for the course ECSE 361 taught by Professor Franciscodgaliana during the Spring '09 term at McGill.

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15 Faraday's Law - Lecture 17 Faradays Law Recalling the...

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