Coon12e_PPT_CH7 - Chapter 7 Conditioning and Learning Some...

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Chapter 7 Conditioning and Learning
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Some Key Terms Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior due to experience Does NOT include temporary changes due to disease, fatigue, injury, maturation, or drugs, since these do NOT qualify as learning, even though they can alter behavior
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Motivation Reinforcement: Any event that increases the probability that a response will recur Response: Any identifiable behavior Internal: Faster heartbeat Observable: Eating, scratching
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Learning: More Key Terms Antecedents: Events that precede a response Consequences: Effects that follow a response
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Classical Conditioning and Ivan Pavlov Russian physiologist who studied digestion Used dogs to study salivation when dogs were presented with meat powder Also known as Pavlovian or respondent conditioning Reflex: Automatic, non-learned response
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Pavlovian Terms Neutral stimulus: Stimulus that does not evoke a response Conditioned stimulus (CS): Stimulus that evokes a response because it has been repeatedly paired with an unconditioned stimulus Unconditioned stimulus (UCS): A stimulus innately capable of eliciting a response
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More Pavlovian Terms Unconditioned response (UCR): An innate reflex response elicited by an unconditioned stimulus (UCS) Conditioned response (CR): A learned response elicited by a conditioned stimulus
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Principles of Classical Conditioning Acquisition: Training period in conditioning when a response is strengthened Higher-order conditioning: A conditioned stimulus (CS) is used to reinforce further learning; the CS is used as though it were a UCS Expectancy: Expectation about how events are interconnected
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Extinction Weakening of a conditioned response through removal of reinforcement
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Spontaneous Recovery Reappearance of a learned response following apparent extinction
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More Principles of Classical Conditioning Stimulus generalization: A tendency to respond to stimuli that are similar, but not identical, to a conditioned stimulus (e.g., responding to a buzzer when the conditioning stimulus was a bell) Stimulus discrimination: The learned ability to respond differently to similar stimuli (e.g., Anya will respond differently to various bells: alarms, school, timer)
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Classical Conditioning in Humans Phobia: Fear that persists even when no realistic danger exists (e.g., arachnophobia; fear of spiders) Conditioned emotional response (CER): Learned emotional reaction to a previously neutral stimulus
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2011 for the course PSYCH 101 taught by Professor Smigla during the Fall '10 term at Joliet Junior College.

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Coon12e_PPT_CH7 - Chapter 7 Conditioning and Learning Some...

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