Coon12e_PPT_CH17-1 - Chapter 17 Prosocial and Antisocial Behavior Affiliation Need to affiliate Desire to associate with other people appears to be

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Chapter 17 Prosocial and Antisocial Behavior
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Affiliation Need to affiliate: Desire to associate with other people; appears to be a basic human trait Social comparison: Making judgments about ourselves by comparing ourselves to others. (i.e., comparing our feelings and abilities to those of other people)
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More on Affiliation Downward comparison: Comparing yourself with someone who ranks lower than you on some area (e.g. money, attractiveness) Upward comparison: Comparing yourself to someone who ranks higher than you do on some area; may be used for self- improvement (something we strive for)
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Interpersonal Attraction Social attraction to another person Physical proximity: Physical nearness to another person in terms of housing, school, work, and so on Physical attractiveness: Person’s degree of physical beauty as defined by his or her culture Halo effect: Tendency to generalize a favorable impression to unrelated personal characteristics
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Interpersonal Attraction (cont) Similarity: Extent to which two people are alike in terms of age, education, attitudes, and so on Similar people are attracted to each other Homogamy: Tendency to marry someone who is like us in almost every way
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Self-Disclosure Process of revealing private thoughts, attitudes, feelings and one’s history to others Should be used cautiously and sparingly when you are the therapist performing therapy May lead to countertransference in therapy
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Reciprocity Return in kind; reciprocal exchange
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Overdisclosure Self-disclosure that exceeds what is appropriate for a relationship or social situation
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Social Exchange Theory Social exchange theory: Rewards must exceed costs for relationships to endure; we unconsciously weigh social rewards and costs Comparison level: Personal standard used to evaluate rewards and costs in a social exchange Relationship needs to be profitable enough to maintain it
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Love Romantic love: Marked by high levels of interpersonal attraction, sexual desire, and heightened arousal
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2011 for the course PSYCH 101 taught by Professor Smigla during the Fall '10 term at Joliet Junior College.

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Coon12e_PPT_CH17-1 - Chapter 17 Prosocial and Antisocial Behavior Affiliation Need to affiliate Desire to associate with other people appears to be

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