Chapter 15 - Chapter 15 Therapies for Psychological...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 15: Therapies for Psychological Disorders 1) The Therapeutic Context a) Goals and Major Therapies i) Four goals: (1) Reaching a diagnosis about what is wrong, possibly determining an appropriate psychiatric label for the presenting problem, and classifying the disorder (2) Proposing a probable etiology (cause of the problem) (3) Making a prognosis of the course the problem will take w/ and w/o treatment (4) Prescribing and carrying out some form of treatment, a therapy designed to minimize or eliminate the troublesome symptoms and, perhaps, their sources ii) Biomedical Therapies- focus on changing the mechanisms that run the central nervous system. (1) Try to alter brain functioning w/ chemical or physical interventions that act directly on the brain-body connection. iii) Psychotherapy- psychological therapies (1) Focus on changing the faulty behaviors people have learned (2) Practiced by clinical psychologists and psychiatrists (3) Types of psychotherapy (a) Psychodynamic approach- views neurotic suffering as the outer symptom of inner, unresolved traumas and conflicts. (i) “Talking Cure”- a therapist helps a person develop insights about the relation b/w the overt symptoms and the unresolved hidden conflicts (b) Behavior therapy- treats the behaviors themselves as disturbances that must be modified. (i) Disorders viewed as learned behavior patterns rather than symptoms of mental disease (c) Cognitive therapy- tries to restructure the way a person thinks by altering the often distorted self-statements a person makes about the causes of a problem (d) Humanistic tradition- emphasize the patients’ values. (i) Directed toward self-actualization, psychological growth, the development of more meaningful interpersonal relationships, and the enhancement of freedom of choice b) Therapists i) Clinical Social Worker- a mental health professional whose specialized training in a school of social work prepares him or her to work in collaboration w/ psychiatrists and clinical psychologists. (1) Trained to consider the social contexts of people’s problems ii) Pastoral Counselor- a member of a religious group who specializes in the treatment of psychological disorders iii) Clinical Psychologist- required to have concentrated his or her graduate school training in the assessment and treatment of psychological problems, completed a supervised internship in a clinical setting, and earned a Ph.D. or Psy.D. iv) Counseling Psychologist- also has Ph.D. or Psy.D.; usually provides guidance in vocation selection, school problems, drug abuse, and marital conflict v) Psychiatrist- must have completed all medical school training for an M.D. degree and also have undergone some postdoctoral specialty training in mental and emotional disorders....
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Chapter 15 - Chapter 15 Therapies for Psychological...

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