300-09%20Viruses2%20FINAL.ppt

300-09%20Viruses2%20FINAL.ppt - VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 1 1...

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Unformatted text preview: VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 1 1 BISC300L Wed., March 25, 2009 Viruses 2 Chap. 14 FINAL VERSION print time 3/26/09 12:25 AM The fu epidemic o¡ 1918-19 killed at least 20 million people. I didn ! t get to slides 35-39, but I le¡t them in this ¢le, since prions are briefy discussed in the book. VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 2 2 Animal Viruses . VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 3 3 Table 14.3 Diversity of animal viruses Type of Genome /Virus Example of Disease dsDNA, linear Poxvirus Smal pox Herpesvirus Genital herpes; chickenpox Adenovirus Common cold; conjunctivitis ssDNA, linear Parvovirus Erythema in¡ectiosum dsDNA, circular Papovavirus Warts Baculovirus Polyhedrosis (lepidopteran insects) ssRNA, (+) strand Picornavirus Polio; common cold Togavirus Rubel a (German measles) Flavivirus Yel ow ¡ever Retrovirus AIDS Coronavirus SARS ssRNA, (-) strand Orthomyxovirus Infuenza Paramyxovirus Measles; mumps Rhabdovirus Rabies Bunyavirus Encephalitis Filovirus Ebola hemorrhagic ¡ever dsRNA Reovirus Diarrhea There are even more types o¡ human viruses than are listed here. VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 4 4 Fig. 29.4: Smallpox Smallpox killed millions of people, perhaps even hundreds of millions. Smallpox was eradicated by a worldwide vaccination program, an outstanding accomplishment of modern medicine. The last community-acquired cases were in Africa in 1977. VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 5 5 MMR Mumps Measles (rubeola) German measles (rubella) Figs. 29.5, 29.3, and 29.2. The MMR vaccine protects against all three of these viral diseases. VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 6 6 Chickenpox (left) and shingles (right) Chickenpox lasts only a couple of weeks. However, anyone who has had chickenpox may come down with shingles in the future, even decades later. VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 7 7 Polio (Paralytic poliomyelitis) Fig. 29.18 LEFT: Black 6th 24.12b OK/PC. VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 8 8 Fig. 14.1 Virus structure: Naked vs. enveloped In a virus, it ! s called an envelope rather than a membrane. Envelopes are more common in animal viruses than in phages (although enveloped phages are known). VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 9 9 Fig. 14.4 Budding An enveloped virus acquires its envelope as it buds out through the cell membrane (or in some cases the nuclear envelope or other internal membrane). The word budding is also used to describe how some bacteria and yeast produce new cells, but that process is very different (see p. 155). Glycoproteins (abbr. gp): Proteins that will end up in the plasma membrane acquire sugar groups as they move from rough ER to smooth ER to Golgi. VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 10 10 (A) Membrane fusion Fig. 14.16 Two mechanisms of viral entry (B) Endocytosis Note that entry by membrane fusion (A) is like the reverse of budding. Endocytosis (B) is a general term for the process shown. Many objects other than viruses can be endocytosed (taken up by endocytosis)....
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2011 for the course BISC 300 at USC.

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300-09%20Viruses2%20FINAL.ppt - VIRUSES 2 3/25/09 1 1...

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