EnvironmentalImpacts_Part_ONE_FALL__2010

EnvironmentalImpacts_Part_ONE_FALL__2010 - December 7, 2010...

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December 7, 2010 Science Headlines Environmental Impacts of Humans – Part 1
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Newfound bacterium casts life in a new light Los Angeles Times December 2, 2010 A Mono Lake bacterium's ability to subsist on deadly arsenic has scientists wide-eyed and rethinking the basics. A team of scientists revealed Thursday that they had found a remarkable quality in a bacterium growing quietly in California's Mono Lake — it is the only known life form able to subsist on the deadly element arsenic . The organism even uses arsenic to build the backbone of its DNA. …. The organism's existence suggests life on Earth has an unappreciated flexibility, experts said, and could have evolved from a wider array of building blocks than previously thought — not only here, but elsewhere in the universe. ……. .
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Previously, all life on Earth was known to rely on six principal elements — carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur and phosphorus. Phosphorus is a key ingredient in the ladder of DNA, as well as many key components of cellular machinery. ……… (Some of the Phosphorus in DNA of the bacteria is replaced by aresnic!!) Researchers said the finding, published online Thursday in the journal Science, had forced them to reconsider what they ought to be looking for as they hunt for signs of life beyond Earth.
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The Ogallala Aquifer: Saving a Vital U.S. Water Source Scientific American March, 2009 On America’s high plains, crops in early summer stretch to the horizon: field after green field of corn, sorghum, soybeans, wheat and cotton. Framed by immense skies now blue, now scarlet-streaked, this 800-mile expanse of agriculture looks like it could go on forever. It can’t. The Ogallala Aquifer -- the vast underground reservoir that gives life to these fields -- is disappearing. In some places, the groundwater is already gone. This is the breadbasket of America —the region that supplies at least one fifth of the total annual U.S. agricultural harvest.
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If the aquifer goes dry, more than $20 billion worth of food and fiber will vanish from the world’s markets. And scientists say it will take natural processes 6,000 years … to replace the water. In the early 1950s, when Rodger Funk started farming near Garden City, Kan., everyone believed the water was inexhaustible . ―People were drilling wells,‖ he says. ―You could pump all the water you wanted to pump.‖ What changed everything for Funk, now age 81, was a public meeting in the late 1960s at Garden City Community College. State and federal geologists, who had been studying where all that water was coming from, announced grim findings. ―They said it’s geologic water . When it’s gone, it’s gone ,‖ Funk says. ―I remember coming home and feeling so depressed.‖
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Population and Anthropogenic Environmental Impacts First, let’s look at how species reproduce in nature. Different species have different reproductive strategies
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2011 for the course ISB 202 taught by Professor Johnson during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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EnvironmentalImpacts_Part_ONE_FALL__2010 - December 7, 2010...

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