LifeOrganization_FALL_2010

LifeOrganization_FALL_2010 - September 9, 2010 Science...

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September 9, 2010 Science Headlines Life’s Organization
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Insect brains 'are source of antibiotics' to fight MRSA September 6, 2010 BBC News A study of locust and cockroach brains has found a number of chemicals which can kill bugs like MRSA . Scientists hope these could become a powerful new weapon to boost the dwindling arsenal of antibiotics used to treat severe bacterial infections . The researchers discovered nine different chemicals in the brains of locusts and cockroaches, which all had anti microbrial properties strong enough to kill 90% of MRSA (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) while not harming human cells .
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Cockroaches have a reputation … for thriving in dirty environments. Simon Lee from Nottingham University is the author of the study. He said that it is this capacity to live in dirty, infectious conditions that mean insect brains contain these kinds of compounds. "They must have some sort of defense against micro organisms. We think their nervous system needs to be continuously protected because if the nervous system goes down the insect dies. But they can suffer damage to their peripheral structures without dying," he told BB News.
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Catching up on lost sleep a dangerous illusion USA Today People who are chronically sleep-deprived may think they're caught up after a 10-hour night of sleep , but new research shows that although they're near-normal when they awake, their ability to function deteriorates markedly as night falls. Some studies show that almost 30% of Americans get less than six hours of sleep at night . The research indicates that the body's daily circadian rhythm hides the effects of chronic sleep loss and gives such people a “second wind” between about 3 p.m. and 7 p.m., when the circadian rhythm is pushing them to be awake. But then they fall off a cliff in terms of attention.
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Staying up for 24 hours straight is bad enough, …. but the study shows that if you do that on top of having gotten less than six hours of sleep a night for two to three weeks, your reaction times and abilities are 10 times worse than they would have been just pulling an all-nighter, says Daniel Cohen, a neurologist at Harvard Medical School … That's dangerous for public health because many critical positions are held by people who have to stay up long hours, including doctors, paramedics, police officers and truckers. ….. To put this in context, prior research has shown that staying awake for 24 hours in a row impairs performance the same as legal intoxication with alcohol (for driving), and six hours of sleep per night for two weeks causes a similar level of impairment as staying awake for 24 hours , Cohen says.
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LIFE’S ORGANIZATION I. Introduction A. General -- Human body has >100 trillion cells -- all have DNA!! -- DNA in each human cell has >3 billion building blocks
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This note was uploaded on 01/27/2011 for the course ISB 202 taught by Professor Johnson during the Spring '08 term at Michigan State University.

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LifeOrganization_FALL_2010 - September 9, 2010 Science...

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