10chapter3 - 3 Interest Groups: Definition An interest is

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: 3 Interest Groups: Definition An interest is something--economic, religious, ethnic, or based on almost anything--that has value and is therefore worth defending. An interest group is a private organization of individuals who have banded together because of a common cause or interest. Political interest groups are those groups that try to influence public policy to their members' advantage. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3 Interest Groups: Definition Interest groups differ from political parties in several respects. The focus of parties is broad, encompassing many interests, while the focus of a group is narrow, comprising just one interest. Parties attempt to gain power by running candidates in elections while groups merely try to influence office- holders. Parties must appeal to the citizenry for support while groups may work entirely behind the scenes. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3 Classification Classifying interest groups according to their main concerns yields six categories. The six basic types of interest groups are economic groups, spiritual groups, artistic- recreational organizations, associations of local governments, public interest groups, and ethnic groups. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3 Interest Groups in the Political Process Who Is Organized? Organized interests are much more powerful (i.e., relevant to the policy-making process) than those that are not organized. There are three general rules of interest group formation. Economic producing groups are more likely to be organized than are consuming groups. People with more education and income are more likely to join groups than are people with less education and income. Those who join groups out of personal involvement tend to feel strongly about the issue around which the group is organized. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3 Interest Groups in the Political Process Functions: In attempting to persuade both the public and individual government officials to adopt their point of view, interest groups perform five important functions in the political process. Groups furnish information to officeholders in all branches of government. Groups politicize and inform their members and others. Groups mediate conflict within their groups. Groups engage in electioneering, especially the contribution of money to candidates, and sometimes in other interventions in the governing process. Groups help to form public opinion by disseminating information. Groups help their members to become more involved democratic citizens. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I 3 Interest Groups in the Political Process Activities Interest groups enhance democratic government in many ways, such as providing information, getting people involved in politics, and contributing to debate about issues....
View Full Document

Page1 / 40

10chapter3 - 3 Interest Groups: Definition An interest is

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online