Corn-to-Ethanol-DryGrind-USDA-Paper

Corn-to-Ethanol-DryGrind-USDA-Paper - 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Modeling the process and costs of fuel ethanol production by the corn dry-grind process Jason R. Kwiatkowski*, Andrew J. McAloon, Frank Taylor, David B. Johnston U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Eastern Regional Research Center, 600 East Mermaid Lane, Wyndmoor, PA 19038-8598, USA * Current Coordinates of Corresponding author. Tel.: 314-275-5993; fax: 314-275-5918. E-mail address : Jason.R.Kwiatkowski@MecsGlobal.com For additional information from USDA-ARS, please contact Andrew J. McAloon at (215) 233-6619 or AMcAloon@arserrc.gov Mention of trade names or commercial products in this article is solely for the purpose of providing specific information and does not imply recommendation or endorsement by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. 1 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Abstract The corn dry-grind process is the most widely used method in the U.S. for generating fuel ethanol by fermentation of grain. Increasing demand for domestically produced fuel and changes in the regulations on fuel oxygenates have led to increased production of ethanol mainly by the dry-grind process. Fuel ethanol plants are being commissioned and constructed at an unprecedented rate based on this demand, though a need for a more efficient and cost-effective plant still exists. A process and cost model for a conventional corn dry-grind processing facility producing 119 million kilograms per year (40 million gallons per year) of ethanol was developed as a research tool for use in evaluating new processing technologies and products from starch-based commodities. The models were developed using SuperPro Designer® software and they handle the composition of raw materials and products, sizing of unit operations, utility consumptions, estimation of capital and operating costs, and the revenues from products and coproducts. The model is based on data gathered from ethanol producers, technology suppliers, equipment manufacturers, and engineers working in the industry. Intended applications of this model include: evaluating existing and new grain conversion technologies, determining the impact of alternate feedstocks, and sensitivity analysis of key economic factors. In one sensitivity analysis, the cost of producing ethanol increased from $0.235 per liter to $0.365 per liter ($0.89 per gallon to $1.38 per gallon) as the price of corn increased from $0.071 per kilogram to $0.125 per kilogram ($1.80 per bushel to $3.20 per bushel). Another example gave a reduction from 151 to 140 million liters per year as the amount of starch in the feed was lowered from 59.5% to 55% (w/w). 2 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23
Background image of page 2
educational uses to show the impact on ethanol production costs of changes in the process and coproducts of the ethanol-from-starch process. Keywords
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 26

Corn-to-Ethanol-DryGrind-USDA-Paper - 1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online