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Aeschylus Persians - W...

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Unformatted text preview: W. =wufiwwlwmwmyxzsfi‘mpwwwanmmpuymrgfig WJW-'I:'«.:=r ““‘°‘:“"‘-Z?"‘-"'.'i‘!‘.':‘¥'-"55’-” THE‘COMPLE'TE GREEK TRAGEDIES Edited by David Crane and Richmond Lattimore .AESCHYLUS - II‘ 'THE SUFWHANT MAIDENS _ ‘ Translated by S. G. Benardete . ' THE PERSLANS‘ . Translated by S. G. Benardete SEVEN AGAINST THEBES _ I Translated by David Grene PROMETHEUSBOUND Translated by David Crane IHE UNIVERSITY 01: cnICAGo PRESIS CHICAGO 5: LONDON ' CHARACTERS Chorus of Persian elders Queen of Persia, wife ochm'us, marker qf Xerxes Persian Herald Ghost of Darius: Xerxes SCENE: In the background the palace of Xerxes at Sousaiin the center ' Chorus THE ‘ PERSIAN S firegmund the tomb of Darius. Of the Persians gone To _the land of Greece Here are the trusted: As protectors of treasure Andof golden thrones we were chosen by Xerxes— Emperor and king, Son ofDarius-w Iu accord with age Guards of the country. _ For the king’s return With his troops of gold Doom is the omen In my heart convulsed, As it whines for its master; For all Asia is gozie: To the- city' of Persians Neither a herald no: horseman returns. And some Agbatana * And some Sousa and Aneient Kissa' leaving, ‘ Both on horse and on ship' . d on foot dispiayed 7 Legions of battlei ; . Amphrenes. Megabates; Astaspes, Amisrres, IO '20 Leaders of Persians, kings, ‘ Who are slaves of the greatestof kings, Guarding the legions they rush, ' And as bowman and knight, , With their temper. resolved; . Feat-fill in aspect, Dreadful in battle. exultant: in horses Artembares, Masistres, The brave archer Imaeus, ‘ And Pharandakas, ' the driver of horses Sousthenes. . " And others were sent By the flourishing Nile: Egyptian—born ‘Sousiscanes, Pegastagon, great Arsames , _ Ruler of sacred Memphis; And Ariomardus Governing nutrient Thebes; . And who dwelling by marshes Are revvers of ships, ' and countless' And the Lydian; soft Who inhabit the Coast ‘ Follow commanders and kings: MetrOgathes and brave Adams, 7 And golden Sardis send - Many charioteers, ' - Horses by threes and by fonts, 7 the sight to behold. . And the neighbors of Tmolus_ ‘ They to yolie a sus'enyrns ‘n‘ IcS-Ga- 30 .40 25:3 " f'rh‘ks‘F'M'f new rr fives" gems-x ‘- In servitude Hellas; And the Mysian lancers, Tharybis, Mardon, Anvils of battle. I " And golden Babylon . Pours forth her crewds— ' Borne by their ships—— Who in drawing the how Rely on their boldness. And the tribes fi'om all Asia 'Who carry the sword Follow beneath the Awesome Parade of their king. Thus of the Persian land 7 Of her men the flower is gone, Nursed .by the earth, and all Asia Iaments, conSumed by desire; . ‘ And parents and wives Counting the days Tremble at lengthening time. The destroyer of cities now, That kineg army, has gone Over the strait to the land On linen—bound pontoons— Tightly was clamped the way— 7 , Helle of Athamas crossing, 7 Yokifig the neck of the sea.— - And the furious leader the herd 7 Of PopulousAsia he drives, Wonderful over the earth, . And admirals stern and rough Marshals of men he trusts:" Gold his descent from Perseus, He is the equal of god.= _ 1:5le .e r n n‘ {12' Bars; suns » so '70 ‘80 In his eyes lazuli flashing Like a snake’s murderous glances, I With mariners, warriors, many, And his Syrian chariot driving, Hard on the glorious spearrnen “The archer-Ares he leads.—' .. ' To the great torrent; of heroes There'is none worthin equal, Who resist, by defenses secured, ' - The unconquerahle billows of ooeant Persians are never defeated, I _ i The people tempered and hrave.=' For divine fate has prevailed sinCe It enjoined Persiansto Wage Wars, Which destroy towers and ramparts, _ , and the glad tumult of-horsemen, ‘ And cities Overthrown.- ' I ‘When the vast ocean was foaming, ' By the winds boisterous whitened, Then they learned, trustingto cables And to pontoons which convey men, To scan the‘sacred sea.= ' I 'Deceit'fiil deception of god?— What mortal man shall avoid it? I With nimbleness, definess, and speed, Whose leaping foot shall escape it? 'Benign and coaxing at first ‘ It leads us astray into nets which No mortal is able to slip, ' ' Whose doom we never can flee. ‘Thus assess my heart is torn, Fearfiil for those Persian arms, 1523‘ or a Escher-1:15 »'- 90 102 113 93 IOI _ sat" s arc-2"ch 'm' we film-Imps (e i ( ' Lest the city hear, alas! That teft of men is Sousa;— And lest the city Kissa shall, ' When the crowds of women cry, - Sing antiphonai, alas! And rend their garb of mourning,=u. All the horse and infantry ' Like a swarm of bees have gone I With the captain of the host, - I Who joined-the headlands ofeitherl , d, Crossing the yoke of the se_a.—I . Beds with longing fillyvithtears. Persian wives in softness weep; Each her armed fiirious lord _ _ Dismissed with gentle love-and grief} ,- Left all alone in the yoke—#- -Bu_t come, Persians. Lot usin this ancient palace sit, , And deep and wisely found our thoughts:' How does King Xerxes fare, Darius’ 5011, How fare his people? Has arrows' hail ' Or-strength of spear conquered? But 10! she homes, A light whose splendor equals eyes of gods, The mother of our king, I kneel. Now all must address and salute her. 0 mostmajeStic Queen of Persians In ample folds'adorned, ' Hail, aged Xerxes’ mother, Consort of Darius, hail! Mistress of the god of Persians, Mother ofa god thou art, no" «TI-IE PER'SIANS a - (Enter Queen :20 :30 & Lars on r-r. Us a. .' Unless the fortune of their arms ‘ Now at last has altered. ' Queen Leaving my gold—clad palace, marriage- _Chamher of Darius, and my own, His queen I’m come. Care quite grates my heart; I fear, my friends, though not fearful for myself; Lest great wealth’s gallop trip prosperity— ‘ Exalted by Darius and some god—- In its‘ own dust. But, unexpectedly, That dread has. doubled: sums of cowardly Wealth do court contempt,_.and indigence Quenches ambition’s flame, even if there’s strength. Though wealth we have unstinted; yet fear . Is for mine eye, Xerxes, whose presence here I count the palace—eye. So things stand thus. Advise my reason, Persians,'old sureties: All my gains with your counsel lie. Chorus 0 Queen of Persia, be assured that never Twice hast thou to tell us word or deed, I Which our willing strength can guide; for we Are loyal, whom thou dost call thy counselors. Queen . _ , With frequent, constant, and nocturnal dreams I have lived, as soon as my son, gathering ' His host had gone, his will to pillage GreeCe; But never a more vivid presence came _ Than yesternight’s. Two women as an apparition came, I One in Persian robes instructed well, The other Doric, both in splendor dressed, Who grand and most magnificent excelled ‘ Us now, their beauty unreproached, spotless: _¢S4» I60 I70 180 ‘samufimmm ' - - “MW-'1 A. 44.. :"".'»i.‘w" maxim" ‘j‘ )‘eL-i' A ' .. THE Persia-N s; 7 Sisters they, who casting for their father’s land, . She Greece received, she Asia, where to dwell. ~ - Then strife arose between‘them, or so I dreamed; -_ And my son, observing this, tries to check And soothe them; he yokes them to a chariot, Bridles their necksz'and one, so arrayed, towers Proud, her mouth obedient to reins; But the other stamps, annoyed, and tends apart Her trappings in her hands: unbridled, seizes . The car and snaps its yoke in two: My son falls, and his father, pitying, Stands by his side, but at whose sight Xerxes Tears his robes; Thus. the night these visions Dreamed: but when, arisen, I tenched the springs’ Fair-flowing waters, approached the altar, wishing To offer sacrifice religiously ' To guardian deities, whose rites these are, Then to Phoehus' hearth I saw an eagle fleeing: Dismh dread I- stood: a falcon swooped . Upon him, its wings in flight, its claws plucked At his head: he did no more than cower, hare-like. Those Were my terrors to son, yours to hear. My son, should he succeed,would be admired; - But if he fails, Persia cannot hold him To account. Whichever comes, safe returned, sovereign He shall rule. Charm Queen mother, excessive fear Or confidence we do not wish to give thee. Ifthy dreams were ominous, approach The gods with supplicatio'ns; pray that these Be unfulfilled, and'blessings be filmed _ ' For thee, thy son, thy city, thy friends. Next thou must libations pour to Earth «5:» rec - ZIO d: AESCHYLU'S-xy: And dead; and beg Darius, of whom thou elitist dream, Send thee those blessings from the nother world--'._ _' To light. for thee and for thy son; and hide-‘ I In darkness evils contrary, retained Within the earth. Propitious‘ be thy prayers. We, prophetic in 'our spirit, kindly - V Counsel-thee: all will prosper. ' Queen ‘ 7 t ' Ah, onally have answered the'first expounders . Of my dreams; May these blessings ripen! '- - H And all, as you enjoin, I’ll sacrifice To nether'gods and :friencis,‘as Soon as I ’ Return. But one thing more I Wish to know: My friends, where is Athens said to he? Chorus 7 Far toward the dying flames of sun. Queen I ‘ i I ' i , Yet still my son lusts to trackit down? - Chorus ' ' _ Then all Hellas would he subject to the‘king, Queen H : So rich in numbers are they? Chorus So great a host As dealt to Persians many woes. ' I Queen 7 Are bow-plucked shafts their armament? Chorus _ I a I 7- . Pikes wielded-close and shielded panopiies. 7 . Queen f What eISe besides? Have they sufiicing wealth? Chorus 7 V I' ‘ 7 Their earth isveinecl with silver treasuries. K56: . 220 ' 230 .240 - Queen «THE PBRSIANS :- I new - Q ‘Who commands them? Who is-shepherd of their host? Chorus They are slaves to none, nor are they subject. _~, But how could they withstand a foreign foe? ' Chang: _ Enough to vanquish Darius’ noble host. . - ‘ Queen We mothers dread to calculate- Chorus ' But soon thou’lt know all: a Persian runner-mules; . ‘ Bearing some fresh report of weal or Woe. Herald '0 cities of Asia, 0 Persian land, And wealth’s great anchorage! Hour at a single stroke prosperity’s ‘ Corrupted, and the flower‘of Persia falls, '_ _ And is'gone. Alas! the first herald ofwoe, He must disclose entire What 'befell: - Persians, all the barbarian host is gone. , Chorus 0 woe! woefill-evil, Novel and' hostile. ' Alas! Persians weep Hearing this woe;- Herald I How all has been destroyed. and I behoid The unexpecteti light of my return. ' Chorus Oh long seems our aged Life to uselders,' c572 . "(Enter Herald.) 250 '260 ummmmmmmwmwmwwmmwmmwmm“WWWWmmwwmm—Wwwwwwwwu-umwmfmnm—MWWWu‘ «this Pens-Ians a «l as-Scnrt'us a Alas! hearing woe 7 _ ' ' " -_ 5 l Queen Um. .= x ' . ' A ' 2 Long am I silent, alas! struck down Herald I ' By disasters exceeding speech and question. _' I I . . _- _ a I 29c ‘ Yet men perforce god—sent misfortunes must ' Endure. Speak. disclose entire what Befell, quietly, though you grieve. _ ' And since I Was witness, deaf to rumor's tales, I can indicate what sorrows came. Chorus I - _ j ‘ ' ' Who did not die?.'For whom of the captains Woe upon woe, in van: _ _ I 5 _ Shall we lament? Whose sceptered death drained his ranks The crowd ofarrows, massed. 270 - Manless? ‘ Came on the hostile land.— I _ Herald .. Herald . 7 ‘ r Xerxes lives to behold the light, but,— I The rotting corpses glut the shore, . ' Queén ~ - ' I And adJaCCnt fields of - ' O for my palace a greater light, _ 30‘ Chums ‘ ' . And after blackest night a whiter day.- l ' Woe upon woe. of fiiends - ‘ Herald The sea—dyed corpses whirl ' r Artemhares, captain often thousand r Vagrant on craggéd shores-.= ' ' . ' - , - Horse, was dashed against Silenia's Herald ' ' ' = ' ' ' Rugged shore; and satrap Dadakes, r The bow Protected “one. but all the host; ' ‘ Spear-struck, did lightly tumble from his ship; Defeated in the naval charge, was lost; ' And native-horn Tenagon, the bravest chm-s _ 7 - r . '1 Bacttian, still haunts se'a—hufl'eted - I ' 7 r 2 - .7 - , \ ' ' .Ajax' isle; and Lilaeus, Arsames, 2:3;;:a<:;rflcg::fifl cry 7 , . r _. . . I - 280 . And Argestes, conquered near the island 7 7 All they made all woe. . Wl‘ziere digs do Eli-advo, heat aflstuhborn coast; -_ I 3:- _ l‘ . _ s , . . An neig ors‘o gyptian N' e—waters, the host destrOYed. _ Adm, mm, and, third, shielded _ . - Pharnouchus, from a single ship 0 most hateful name of Salamis! Were drovmed; and Matallus. saw-P Of 0111363. O Woe! how I mourn recalling Athens. _- _ r , i f : Dying, leader of a thousand horse. Chants Changed to richest red his thickset' flowing Athens hateful to he: foes, g3 Beard, and dipped his skin in crimson dyes; ‘ ‘ Recall how many ' '- And Magian Arabus and Bactrian ' Ambes, all aliens in a' savage Persians widOWed vain, Country, perished; Amphistreus, who wielded I And mothers losing sonsk—r ¢ 59 i. «‘53 :9 . n: vans on! I. vs a» I The muchehelaboring spear, and Amistris, BraveAriomardus, all made Sardis Weep; . And Mysian Seisames, Tharybis, of five times fifty ships, His race ijiaean, fair to look upon" (His fortune was not), dead he. lies; - . And the leader of‘Cilicians ‘sin'gIe-handed Taxed the enemy"with<toil, and nobly Died. So many of the rulers I ' Recall, but of the many woes, report - But fiw. ' Queen Alas! I hear the greatest ' Of misfortunes, shame of Persians, and shrill Lament. But tell me, returning to your tale, What was the number of the Grecian ships, I That thought themselves a match for Persian Arms in naval combat? ‘ Herald Had numbers counted, 7 The barbarian warships surer would have won; The Greeks but numbered thirty tens, and ten -’ ' ‘1 Apart from these a chosen squadron Errand; ' But Xerxes, and this I know full Well, _a thousand Led; and seven and two hundred ranked As queens in swifhiess. The count stood so. Seemed We unequal? Some deity destroyed Our host, who weighing down the balance'swung The beam of fortune. The gods Saved the city Of the goddess. - Queen _ I What? Athens still - Stands unsacked? .60, '~ 32.0 33° 34° ,THB'ransmns In As long as there are men The city Stands- _ Queen I I What was the beginning Of disaster? Tell me. Who I I I ? The. Greeks? My son—exultant 1n his numbers. Herald Either an avenger or a II God, my Lady (whence it came I know not), Began the'whole disaster. From Athenian . Ranks a Greek approached. addressmg IXerxes Thus: “When the gloom of blackest night I Will fall, the Greeks will not remain, but leap To rowing—bench, and each by secret course Will save his life." And he your son, upon His hearing this, in ignorance of Greek I Guile and the jealousy of gods, II . HarangUed his captains publicly: As soon As sunlit rays no longer burn the earth, ' And darkness sweeps the quarters of the sky, Ran]: the swarm of ships in three Iflotillas, Guard they the entrances, the straits sea-pound, 'And girdle others round Ajax lsle; I But if the Greeks escape their ev1l doom, ' Contriving secret flight, all your heads Will roll. I warrant it.” So he spoke In humored pride: of the god-given fiiture Nothing he knew. And, having supped, they set _ Themselves in order, each heart obedient; And sailors hounda thong about each per. When the glare of sunlight died, and night Came on, every man was at his oar, ‘Every man at arms who knew them. . :61.) 35° 37° 1c AESCHYLUS i- 1 ,s ' i i i ‘E «run mansist n WMWWuWWWW - ' - . ‘ NWWWWWM, ,, _ i " a s Rani: enc d ran]; .. - ‘ _ To smdogfiffi had begiggnfefom salad 3'30. g With ships’ wrecks and men’s blood. 42.0 A11 night the CaPtains kept the fleet awake; 2 a?“ $1“? we??? “‘1”??? And night ran on. No Grecian arm set Every wars 1P urg ' “5 om mar C secret sail. b t h h as y Rout; and who survived that expedition, white and 1&0: tb: Ste: 0f day' Like mackerel or some catch of fish, The sky h-k ’hagm 0 cross : Were stunned and slaughtered, boned with broken oars From thgaégi; 3:11 mgr semi? And spiintered wrecks: lamentations. cries I The high.Pitcheé cam Bear :01: 5 mm 39° Possessed the open sea, until the-black _ Deacin ' h . f 6 among. us’ Eye of evening, closing, hushed them. The sum A solemn 1:3;npecilagrufl Bing]: Egg If to flee) Of troubles, even if I should rehearse them Rushed with fervent boldness: Hum-Pets flared, 1:: 2333's, I qould .no‘i aliamt' Resr 43° Putting every Greek aflame. At once - S n r ‘ newt}: adj-:13 e y Y Concordant strokes of oars in dissonance 0- 933‘ a nun? 1' - :‘lhgpedilthc waters ficpths': soon we saw ‘ QHEIZS‘ a sea of troubles breaks in waves - m a : first the right Wing led In order, ' l' ‘ _ - . Next advanced the whole armada; 400 E On the Pernans and barbarian tribes.- A great concerted cry we heard: "0 Greek ' Herald " - Sons, advance! Free your fathers’ land, ' 7 But what we ve told would scarcely balance woes Free your sons, your wives,.the sanctuaries ' a: Untold: misfortune came upon them, which Ofpaternal gods, the sepulchcrs Swung the beam to weigh them double these. Of ancestors. Now the contest's drawn: Queen ‘ ' __ . AH 15 at stake!" And babel Persian tongueS ’ But: what greater hatred could fortune show?- _ 30.53 to meet it: no longer wonld the action What misfortune came upon the soldiers, ‘ , LOIUcf- Warships struck their brazen beaks _ swinging the beam of troubles to' greater woes?- ‘ 4.40 Together: a Grecian man-oilwar began I Herald ' ' ' The charge, a Phoenician ornamented stem 41 o I I All the Persians; who were in mmezs Prime.- ‘Was smaShed; “other drove against anodmf- ‘ Excellent in soul, and nobly bred to grandeur,- Fflstl-thc floods Of P‘mians held the BBC: .- Always first in trust, met their death BL": When the “arrows C110de them. and rescue hopeless, "In infamy, dishonor, and in ugliness. Smitten by ,prows, their bronze jaws gaping,- ' ' Shattered entire fl f * Queen 7 'Th ‘ . “'3? our. 56H.) oars. , .- Oh, wretched am I, alas! What doom 3 Grew WShIPSs Calculating, Clasth ‘ r I I h IDESE I Ronnd, and encircled us; ships showed their belly! ' I 7 3 r I I ' - ' a; Herald _ There is an island fronting Salamis, No longer could we see the water, charged ' I ' I 62 I l ' ‘ , v « Anscnrtus'»: Small, scarce an anchorage for ships, Where the dancer Pan rejoices on the shore; Whither Xerxes sent those men to kill-7 The shipwrecked enemies who sOught the island _ . . As a refiige (easily, he thought, The Grecian arms would be subdued); '- -- . I I He also bid, them rescue friends. He conned , The fiiture ill. For when a god gate-Greeks ‘ The glory, that very day, fenced in bronze, _ They leaped ashore, and drew the circle-tight At every point: mewed up, we could not ' ' I Many rattled to the ground, whom stones Had felled, and arrows Sher by 'bOWstring. Others killed; and in a final rush,_ ‘ The end: they hacked, mangled their wretched limbs, ' Until the life of all was gone. Xerxes mourned, beholding the loWest depths Ofwoe; who, seated on a height that near: a The sea commanded all his hoist, his robes Destroying (and his'lamentations shrill); ' Dispatched his regiments on land: they fled . Orderless. Now you may lament their hate, Added to the others' summed before. . . - Queen ' O hatefiil deity! how the Persians You deoeived! Bitter was the vengeance Which my son at famous Athens found: She could not sate her appetite with those Whom Marathon had made the Persians lose. For these my son, exacting as reqnital Punishment (or so he thOught) Called on hiinself so numerous A train of woes. Tell me, .what ships escaped?’ ‘ Where are they now? Can yon clearly tell? ‘ £64;- 45 _ 47o « THE PBRSiua-ns »_ aid . I i I - r ‘- HeWho captained the remaining ships set sail ' I H I I - _ 480 Before the wind, fleeing in disorder; - - - arm rished in Boeotia: some, .7 ' lining: of pieiious warren-were rackedwith Ithn'st, And some, gasping emptin on air: Crossed to Phocis, Locria, the Malian ‘ _‘_ I 3 ' Gulf. where Spercheian'waters' kindly drench- I I i r- The plain; and thence Achaea. and Thessaly I L. ‘ ‘ .490 . Received us, Wanting: theremost died -_ I A I I I I ‘3 In hunger and in thirst: both We ‘f'e1t'. I 7 To Magnesia and Macedonia we came,- The River Axius, the reedy marsh ‘ Of Bolba, the mountain Pangaeon. _ I And Thrace. There i...
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