ph2a_quiz1_soln

ph2a_quiz1_soln - Quiz 1 Solutions Nate Bode October 31,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Quiz 1 Solutions Nate Bode October 31, 2009 Note: The first thing we should do is take a look at the Hookes Law equation that the torsional springs obey. The first thing we should note is that [ i ] = Force Length , so we know we are dealing with a situation unlike those seen in class and in sections (though an example was given during the quiz review). Therefore, because 1 and 2 are unitless, we should also take note that [ ] = Force Length . The only other physical constants given are g which has units of acceleration and the mass and length of the pendulum L which obviously have units of mass and length, respectively. The only way we can get a frequency out of these is by the combinations p g/L and p /mL 2 . The symmetric mode has both masses swinging in phase which means that the spring is doing nothing. Therefore we know that symmetric = p g/L. The antisymmetric mode is a little more complicated, but if you think carefully you will know that this problem is now completely analogous to two pendula coupled by a standard spring, a problem we have done before which by direct analogy k/m /mL 2 gives us the antisymmetric modes frequency: antisymmetric = r g L + 2 I , where I = mL 2...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 01/28/2011 for the course PH 2 taught by Professor Dudko during the Spring '09 term at UCSD.

Page1 / 4

ph2a_quiz1_soln - Quiz 1 Solutions Nate Bode October 31,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online