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Chapter 16 US - Chapter 16 Life at the Turn of the 20th...

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Chapter 16: Life at the Turn of the 20th Century Section 1: Science and Urban Life -Advances in science and technology helped solve urban problems, including overcrowding. Technology and City Life -Skyscrapers - with the invention of the elevator and the development of internal steel skeletons to bear the weight of buildings, buildings could be made taller. *Louis Sullivan - 1890-1891, he designed the 10-story Wainwright Building in St. Louis. He called the new breed a skyscraper a “proud and soaring thing .” *Daniel Burnham - designed the Flatiron Building , which still stands at the intersection of Fifth Avenue and 23rd St. in New York City. Electric Transit - Electricity transformed urban transportation. Richmond Virginia became the first city to electrify its urban transit. -By the turn of the 20th century, intricate networks of electric streetcars -- also called trolley cars -- ran from outlying neighborhoods to downtown offices and department stores. Engineering and Urban Planning *John Augustus Roebling - 1883 designed the Brooklyn Bridge. It became known as the eighth wonder of the world and took 14 years to build. *Frederick Law Olmsted - a landscape architect, spearheaded the movement for planning urban parks. (Central Park ) He envisioned the park as a rustic haven in the center of a busy city. The finished park featured boating and tennis facilities, a zoo, and bicycle paths. -In the 1870s, Olmsted planned the landscaping for Washington , DC, and St. Louis. City Planning *Daniel Burnham - as an architect in Chicago , his motto was "Making no little plans. They have no magic to stir men's blood. " -He created a plan for Chicago that included a lakefront of elegant parks . New Technology A Revolution in Printing - American mills began to produce cheap paper from wood pulp, which was also durable enough so that print could go on both sides. Faster production and lower costs made newspapers and magazines for more affordable. Airplanes - in the 20th century, brothers, *Orville and Wilbur Wright , bicycle manufacturers from Dayton, Ohio, experimented with new engines powerful enough to keep "heavier- then-air" craft afloat.
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