N_Diode_N2 - Diodes (02) Reference: Microelectronic...

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1 Diodes (02) Reference: Microelectronic Circuits: 5 th Edition By Adel S. Sedra & Kenneth C. smith
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2 INTRODUCTION In the last course (EE-102) we dealt entirely with linear circuits. However, there are many signal-processing functions that can be implemented only by nonlinear circuits. Examples include the generation of dc voltages from the ac power supply and the generation of signals of various waveforms (e.g., sinusoids, square waves, pulses, etc.). Also, digital logic and memory circuits constitute a special class of nonlinear circuits. The simplest and most fundamental nonlinear circuit element is the diode. Just like a resistor, the diode has two terminals; but unlike the resistor, which has a linear (straight-line) relationship between the current flowing through it and the voltage appearing across it, the diode has a nonlinear i-v characteristic.
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3 INTRODUCTION We are about to undertake the study of diodes. In order to understand the essence of the diode function, we begin with a fictitious element, the ideal diode . We then introduce the silicon junction diode , explain its terminal characteristics, and provide techniques for the analysis of diode circuits. The latter task involves the important subject of device modeling . Of the many applications of diodes, their use in the design of rectifiers (which convert ac to dc) is the most common. Therefore we shall study rectifier circuits in some detail and briefly look at a number of other diode applications. Further nonlinear circuits that utilize diodes and other devices will be found throughout the text book, but particularly in Chapter 13.
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4 INTRODUCTION… To understand the origin of the diode terminal characteristics, you did consider its physical operation (during the initial courses of Physics and earlier in your intermediate study; FSc or equivalent programs) . That study of the physical operation of the pn-junction and of the basic concepts of Semiconductor physics was intended to provide a foundation for understanding the characteristics of junction diodes and other semiconductor devices : the bipolar junction transistor (BJT) and the field-effect transistor (FET), to be studied later in the course. ( You are reminded to refresh and revise some of those concepts ) Although most of this study on diodes, is concerned with the study of silicon pn-junction diodes, we are likely to briefly consider some specialized diode types, including the photodiode and the light emitting diode.
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5 THE IDEAL DlODE Current-Voltage Characteristic The ideal diode may be considered the most fundamental nonlinear circuit element. It is a two-terminal device having the circuit symbol of Fig. 3.l(a) and the i-v characteristic shown in Fig. 3.l(b). The terminal characteristic of the ideal diode can be interpreted as
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2011 for the course EE 203 taught by Professor Gp.(r)muzaffarali during the Fall '10 term at College of E&ME, NUST.

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N_Diode_N2 - Diodes (02) Reference: Microelectronic...

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