N_Diode_N6 - DiodeApplications (06) CHAPTER2

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    1 Diode Applications  Diode Applications  (06) (06) CHAPTER 2 CHAPTER 2 Electronic Devices and Circuit Theory, By  Robert Boylestad & Louis Nashelsky
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    2 Load Line Analysis Load Line Analysis The  load line  plots all possible current (I D ) conditions for all voltages applied  to the diode (V D ) in a given circuit. E/R is the maximum I D  and E is the  maximum V D .   Where the load line and the  characteristic curve  intersect is the Q point,  which specifies a particular I D  and V D  for a given circuit.
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    3 How to determine the Q point of a system? How to determine the Q point of a system? Identify diode model Using Kirchoff’s Law : Set V D  = 0V (horizontal line) Set I = 0A (vertical line) Obtain V DQ , I DQ  from the graph intersection ( Q-point)
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    4 Diode Approximation Diode Approximation Approximate model notation In Forward Bias : Silicon Diode: V D  = 0.7V Germanium Diode: V D  = 0.3V In Reverse Bias:   Both diodes act like opens V D  = source voltage and I D  =0A Ideal model notation V D  = 0V and I D  = 0A Si Ge
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    5 Diode in DC Series Circuit:  Forward Bias The diode is forward bias. V D   = 0.7V (or V = E if E <0.7V) V R  = E – V D I D  = I R  = V R  /R
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    6 The diode is reverse biased. V D  = E   • V = 0V • I = I R  = I T  = 0A Diode in DC Series Circuit:  Reverse Bias
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  7 An open circuit can have any voltage across its  terminals, but the current is always 0A. A short circuit has a 0V drop across its terminals, but the  current is limited only by the surrounding network. Source notation :
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2011 for the course EE 203 taught by Professor Gp.(r)muzaffarali during the Fall '10 term at College of E&ME, NUST.

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N_Diode_N6 - DiodeApplications (06) CHAPTER2

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