SM_7B - Chapter 7 - Section B - Non-Numerical Solutions 7.2...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 7 - Section B - Non-Numerical Solutions 7.2 ( a ) Apply the general equation given in the footnote on page 260 to the particular derivative of interest here: T P S = T S P S P T The two partial derivatives on the right are found from Eqs. (6.17) and (6.16); thus, T P S = T C P V T P For gases, this derivative is positive. It applies to reversible adiabatic expansions and compressions in turbines and compressors. ( b ) Application of the same general relation (page 260) yields: T V U = T U V U V T The two partial derivatives on the right are found from Eqs. (2.16) and (6.31); thus, T V U = 1 C V P T P T V For gases, this may be positive or negative, depending on conditions. Note that it is zero for an ideal gas. It applies directly to the Joule expansion , an adiabatic expansion of gas confined in a portion of a container to fill the entire container. 7.3 The equation giving the thermodynamic sound speed appears in the middle of page 250. At written, it implicitly requires that V represent specific volume. This is easily confirmed by a dimensional analysis. If V is to be molar volume, then the right side must be divided by molar mass: c 2 = V 2 M P V S ( A ) Applying the equation given in the footnote on page 260 to the derivative yields: P V S = P S V S V P This can also be written: P V S = P T V T S V S T P T V P = T S V S T P P T V T V P Division of Eq. (6.17) by Eq. (6.30) shows that the first product in square brackets on the far right is the ratio C P / C V . Reference again to the equation of the footnote on page 260 shows that the second product in square brackets on the far right is ( P / V ) T , which is given by Eq. (3.3). Therefore, P V S = C P C V P V T = C P C V 1 V 573 Substitute into Eq. ( A ): c 2 = VC P M C V or c = VC P M C V ( a ) For an ideal gas, V = RT / P and = 1 / P . Therefore, c ig = RT M C P C V ( b ) For an incompressible liquid, V is constant, and = 0, leading to the result: c = . This of course leads to the conclusion that the sound speed in liquids is much greater than in gases....
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SM_7B - Chapter 7 - Section B - Non-Numerical Solutions 7.2...

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