Wide-Area monitoring and control algorithms for large power systems using synchrophasors

Wide-Area monitoring and control algorithms for large power systems using synchrophasors

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1 Abstract — Power system operation is constantly facing contingencies such as from line faults and generator outages. For operational reliability, the system must be able to withstand the contingencies, either by itself (for N-1 contingency) or with the help of Special Protection Schemes (SPS) or Remedial Action Schemes (for N-2 or worse contingencies). When the system is operating under unforeseen conditions or under unusually high stress, the system can face dynamic instability related to any of voltage stability, small-signal stability or transient stability phenomena. At Washington State University, we have been developing real-time monitoring and control algorithms for handling these three types of instability phenomena using wide-area synchrophasor measurements. The presentation will highlight the different phenomena and the tools that have been developed for fast detection and mitigation of the instability mechanisms. Index Terms —Power system stability, Power system control, Power system dynamics, voltage stability, small-signal stability, transient stability, oscillations, synchrophasors. I. INTRODUCTION ower system can be considered operationally reliable or secure when the operation meets the following four properties: 1) Acceptability or viability (all voltages and currents stay within acceptable tolerances); 2) Small-signal stability (system can withstand or damp out small-scale disturbances); 3) Transient stability (system can withstand all credible contingencies); 4) Voltage stability (system continues to operate at nominal voltages without degenerating into voltage collapses or voltage declines). This paper will highlight recent efforts at Washington State University (WSU) on wide-area monitoring and control topics using synchrophasors. Our research has been aimed at developing real-time tools related to the three properties 2), 3) and 4) above, namely, small-signal stability, transient stability and voltage stability. The authors gratefully aknowledge funding from Power System Engineering Research Center (PSERC), Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), Entergy, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, and Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS). Vaithianathan “Mani” Venkatasubramanian, Guoping Liu, Xunning Yue and Qiang Zhang are with School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, WSU, Pullman, WA 99164, USA. (email: mani@wsu.edu) Michael Sherwood is now with Pacific Gas and Electric, San Francisco, CA, and the work in this paper was done while he was a student at WSU. Power system operation is undergoing major technological advances with many new installations of synchrophasors all across the North American grid as well in power systems all over the world. North American SynchroPhasor Initiative (NASPI) is an excellent example of recent efforts in this direction. Synchrophasor measuremets together with modern communication technology facilitate the monitoring of the current state of the power system including the phase angles at critical buses in a coordinated fashion. Our research aims to
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This note was uploaded on 01/29/2011 for the course ENGR 52 taught by Professor Mcmillan during the Spring '10 term at Baylor Med.

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Wide-Area monitoring and control algorithms for large power systems using synchrophasors

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