Immigration_IPSAJapan paper14.6

Immigration_IPSAJapan paper14.6 - Organizing Immigration a...

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Organizing Immigration – a Comparison of New Zealand and Norway Tom Christensen University of Oslo Tom.Christensen@stv.uio.no Per Lægreid, University of Bergen Per.Lagreid@aorg.uib.no Richard Norman Victoria University of Wellington Richard.Norman@vuw.ac.nz Paper to be presented at Fukuoka 2006 – IPSA World Congress. RC27 – Structure and Organization of Government – Panel RC27.19 – Core Executives: Change and Dynamics of Central Government Organization.
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Abstract This paper focuses on the organization of immigration policy and delivery, and particularly on how policy is turned into administrative action. We will address these questions by examining the cases of Norway and New Zealand focusing on the regulatory side of immigration policy in central government. In this paper we first give a brief introduction to the immigration context in the two countries. Secondly, we introduce three theoretical perspectives focusing on hierarchy, realpolitik, cultural features, myths and also the problem of blame avoidance. Thirdly, we describe developmental features in designing the central immigration apparatus by focusing on main structural changes and actors, conflicts and cleavages. Fourthly, we examine the current features of the immigration apparatus in the two countries by focusing on vertical and horizontal specialization. Norway represents a country with low immigration and is generally known as a reluctant NPM reformer. New Zealand has high levels of immigration and has been an eager adopter of NPM techniques. The organizational development in this policy field is to some extent going against the grain in both countries. New Zealand has had a considerable stability in the structure used for the administration of immigration while Norway has been an eager immigration reformer. While New Zealand has avoided an NPM trend towards increased vertical and horizontal specialization in this policy field Norway has walked a long way on that path. 2
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Introduction. Immigration policy is an extremely complex and sensitive field of politics and administration. It addresses both general problems of regulation and integration of migrants by a host country. It involves specific cases related to asylum, refugees, citizenship, residency, reuniting families, and work permits (Lahav 2004). Integration affects sectors such as housing, education, employment, health, crime and social affairs, and often several sectors simultaneously. Immigration policy is conducted at the international, national, regional and local levels (Cornelius et al. 2004). Thus immigration represents ‘wicked’ issues that cannot easily be solved within one sector or policy area or at one administrative level. Immigration policy involves balancing control, coordination, agency autonomy, professional competence and judicial rights. Policy influences organizational arrangements and the organization of immigration has implications for policy. International organizations attempt to regulate the increasing flows of people, and
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course BUSN 101 taught by Professor Jun during the Spring '10 term at DeVry Chicago.

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Immigration_IPSAJapan paper14.6 - Organizing Immigration a...

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