supreme - Supreme Introduction In the fifty years after...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Supreme Introduction In the fifty years after 1763, the American people founded a new American nation. First, they won their Independence from Britain in the American Revolution (1775-1783). Then they established a new republican government that was to endure many lifetimes of change and become the government you see today. The Purpose and Powers of the Supreme Court The courts unusual authority derives from its duel legal and political roles, for it is the nation’s highest appellate law court and at the same time, the official interpreter and expounder of the U.S. Constitution. Because many of the most important provisions of the Constitution are extremely broad and offer much room for difference of opinion, the court’s influence in the political development of the American republic has been very great, often exceeding that of the President or Congress. Today, the court has come a long way since its establishment. It’s here as the Founding Fathers of our nation intended it to be. More exercising of authority is still to come though, such as with issues on abortion, civil rights and church-state relations. How the Court Operates
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

supreme - Supreme Introduction In the fifty years after...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online