SDS - INeverKnewIHada Choice 9thed. Wadsworth...

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I Never Knew I Had a  Choice -  9th ed. Wadsworth A division of Cengage Learning, Inc.
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Invitation to Personal Learning  and Growth THE SERENITY PRAYER “God, grant me the serenity to accept the  things I cannot change, courage to change  the things I can, and wisdom to know the  difference.” What are your personal reactions to the Serenity  Prayer?
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Balancing Self-Esteem and  Other-Esteem We are social beings and many of our relationships are affected  by relationships with others Self-esteem and other-esteem should not be thought of as polar  opposites Other-esteem involves respect, acceptance, caring, valuing, and  promoting of others Strive to see the world anew by reexamining your present beliefs  and values
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Happiness A subjective matter: Our perceptions and  feelings about what we have are crucial in  bringing us happiness  Ingredients considered  very important  for overall  happiness: love and intimate relationships, work,  genetics, and personality Largely a function of the choices we make 
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Happiness The Dalai Lama claimed real secrets to happiness  are determination, effort, and time  Positive psychology movement emphasizes what  makes people happy Founder: Martin Seligman The study of positive emotions and positive character  traits  Shares common principles with humanistic  psychology
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Humanistic Approach  to Human Growth Self-actualization is the core of a humanistic view  of people Self-actualization is a process you work toward, rather than a  final destination at which you arrive Striving for growth implies becoming all you are capable of  becoming Abraham Maslow’s model of the self-actualizing person offers a  foundation for understanding growth
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Key Figures of the  Humanistic Movement Alfred Adler  stressed self-determination and viewed  people  as creative, active, goal-oriented, and choice-making beings Carl Jung  believed that humans are not merely shaped by  past events, but strive for growth as well Carl Rogers  stressed the importance of nonjudgmental  listening and acceptance as a condition for people to feel  free enough to change Abraham Maslow  emphasized joy, creativity, and self- fulfillment
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Key Figures of the  Humanistic Movement Natalie Rogers  believed the creative arts could be used  to  help clients express deep emotions often inaccessible  through words   Virginia Satir  was highly intuitive and believed spontaneity,  creativity, humor, self-disclosure, risk-taking, and personal  touch were central to family therapy   Zerka Moreno  believed healing could occur by exploring 
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2011 for the course SDS 3482 taught by Professor Thompson during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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SDS - INeverKnewIHada Choice 9thed. Wadsworth...

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