ec8 - OutlinePeerReview...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
 2/5/11 Outline Peer Review Do each of the subtopics relate directly back to the  argument in the thesis? Does the outline clearly show a progression of  argument?  Are there any gaps in the argument, or areas that you  think might need further development? Does each main idea have at least two sub-ideas?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 2/5/11 Outline Peer Review Does the writer address the larger significance of the  topic throughout the outline? Are there any parts of the paper that seem  unnecessary? Are there any ideas that the paper ought to have  addressed?
Background image of page 2
 2/5/11 Citation: General Guidelines Always, always, always document things that did not  originate with you Common Knowledge Same information documented in numerous credible sources Something your reader presumably already knows When in doubt, cite PowerPoint adapted from  www.abac.edu/bray/Incorporating%20Sources %20Handout.doc
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 2/5/11 Short Quotations When you need testimony from an authority (state  the authority’s credentials in an attributive tag) In summaries, when you want to reproduce a source’s voice, particularly if the language is striking or  memorable In lieu of paraphrase when the source language is  memorable Avoid dangling quotations by always using an  attributive tag, and then follow up each quotation by  commentary in your own words
Background image of page 4
 2/5/11 Long Quotations When you intend to analyze or critique the quotation  – the quotation is followed by your detailed analysis  of its ideas or rhetorical features When the flavor and language of testimonial  evidence is important If the quote is more than four lines, set it off as a  block quote. See AB 624
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 2/5/11 Writing Direct Quotations Keep the source author’s name in the same sentence  as the quote Mark the quote with quotation marks, or set it off  from your text in its own block Quote no more material than is necessary; if a short  phrase from a source will suffice, don’t quote an  entire paragraph
Background image of page 6
 2/5/11 Using Direct Quotations To give context to a quote or otherwise add wording 
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 23

ec8 - OutlinePeerReview...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online