yd4 - AsianAmericans AsianAmericans Sources: Sources:

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Asian Americans Asian Americans
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Sources: Sources: Marger 2009, pp. 28-38
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Who are Asian Americans? Who are Asian Americans? “Asian Americans” and “Asian- Pacific Americans”  is an umbrella term  for Americans with ancestral roots in  Asia or the Pacific Islands A serious oversimplification Constitute nearly 5% of the population Current largest groups are Chinese,  Filipino, and Asian Indian, with  substantial populations of Japanese,  Koreans, and Vietnamese
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Asian Immigration in the US Asian Immigration in the US Two distinct groups: Old Asian immigration Composed of Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, and  Filipinos Mostly unskilled laborers, recruited for construction or  agricultural work Because of restrictive measures, very few additional  Asians entered US society until the revision of  immigration laws in 1965 Current immigration Noticeably of higher class origin Well-educated and occupationally skilled More diverse in national origin Except for Japanese, Asians in the US are  predominantly first-generation immigrants
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Chinese Americans Chinese Americans Factors of immigration Push factors: unfavorable social and economic  conditions and political unrest in China Pull factor: labor opportunities in Spanish, Portuguese,  Dutch and British colonies  Demographics of early Chinese immigrants Single males, lured by the discovery of gold in  California in the 1840s Construction of transcontinental railroads in the 1860s Perceived by white workers as labor threat Forced out of their jobs Restricted by legal measures to limit their occupational  and residential movement Chinese Exclusion Act  A LANDMARK in American ethnic history First time that a specific group  was barred from entrance into US
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Chinese Americans Chinese Americans Because Chinese immigrants were almost always  males    No possibility of a natural population increase No creation of stable and thriving ethnic community However because of relentless discrimination   forced  the Chinese into urban ghettos, “Chinatowns” Early 1960s  Chinese population began to grow Due to the repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1943 Entry of war brides, refugees and some scientific  personnel after WW II Growth helped correct  the unbalanced sex ration Revised immigration legislation for 1965 helped large- scale Chinese population 
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Chinese Americans Chinese Americans Sinophobia Dirty, immoral unassimilable Sly, untrustworthy, and inscrutable  Stemmed from their labor role and their  alleged impact on the job market  Coolie 
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This note was uploaded on 02/04/2011 for the course SYD 3700 taught by Professor Fernandez during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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yd4 - AsianAmericans AsianAmericans Sources: Sources:

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