SPED Unit 1.pdf - Intro to Special Education Chapter 1 Getting Oriented to Exceptional Learners and Special Education \u25cf Special education giving

SPED Unit 1.pdf - Intro to Special Education Chapter 1...

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Intro to Special Education Chapter 1: Getting Oriented to Exceptional Learners and Special Education Special education: giving specialized and modified instruction to students with needs/disabilities Study of exceptional learners is a “soft science” too many variables can’t be controlled and differences between individual learners is vast Focus on ability (what students can do) vs. disability Begin instruction from student strength Have students in least restricted learned enviornment; start student in general education classroom, then if needed, move to smaller groups to one-on-one Disability/Handicap/Inabilities Disability: inability/diminished capacity/impairment doing something most people with typical maturation, opportunity, or instruction can do Tied to expectation Ex. blindness, not being able to read, write, walk, or perform function skills Handicap: a disadvantage imposed to an individual A disability does not have to be a handicap Blindness in the dark -> blind person is not handicapped by the darkness because they have adapted; for seeing people, the darkness is a handicap Physically handicapped person watching basketball game in an arena A handicap is not necessarily caused by a disability Inability: all disabilities are an inability to do something Not every inability is a disability Ex. 3-month-old cannot talk or walk, is an inability (not disability), but if they continue to grow and cannot talk is a disability Age, lack of instruction, human ability Language Used for Individuals with Disabilities Person-first language Introduced in 1992 Person first language puts the person before the disability or category Examples of person first language include “she has autism” as opposed to “she is autistic” “He receives special education” vs. “he is a special ed kid” Emphasize the child first and more importantly than the disability Why is this important? Shows respect for the person and as a part of society, focuses on them as a person and not a disability Examples
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The autistic boy → the boy with autism Mr. Smith is in a chair → Mr. Smith uses a wheelchair The dyslexic kid → the child with dyslexia Intellectual Disability Agency: Social Security Administrations Summary: Published in the Federal Register on January 28, 2013 to replace the word “mental retardation” with “intellectual disability” Educational Definition of Exceptional Learner Exceptional learners require special education and related services to reach their full potential Significantly different from other students Sensory, physical, cognitive, emotional/behavioral, communication Special gifts and talents Need education/services to meet special needs that cannot be met in the general education setting Prevalence Percentage of a population or number of people having a particular exceptionality 6.7 million students (8.7%) receive special education services in US schools Between ages 6 and 21 Not certainly the number of students who have the disability
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