Ratifying the Constitution

Ratifying the Constitution - Ratifying the Constitution...

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Ratifying the Constitution - Review of Constitution o Article 1 Congress (popularly elected) o Article 2 Executive o Article 3 Judiciary (Supreme Court elected for life) - Congress taxes and declares war, two senators per state - The president appoints justices that are confirmed by senators - Nine out of thirteen states’ votes in order to ratify FEDERALISTS ANTIFEDERALISTS Who they were Property owners, creditors, merchants Small farmers, frontiersmen, debtors, shopkeepers What they believed Believed that elites are best fit to govern, “excessive democracy” is dangerous Government should be close to the people. Concentration of power is dangerous. System of government they favored Favored strong national government, elites should have governmental power Favored retention of power by state governments and protection of individual rights Their leaders Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, George Washington Patrick Henry, George mason, Elbridge Gerry, George Clinton Anti-Federalists
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Ratifying the Constitution - Ratifying the Constitution...

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