fall 2008 con law powerpoint

fall 2008 con law powerpoint - Todays agenda Finish courts...

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Today’s agenda Finish courts and ADR Finish ethics Start Con Law Thurs – continue Con law
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Constitutional Authority to Regulate Business A little history Commerce Clause The Dormant Commerce Clause The Supremacy Clause Business and the Bill of Rights Freedom of Speech Freedom of Religion
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Constitutional Authority to Regulate Business Due Process and Equal Protection Privacy Rights
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The Constitutional Powers of Government The U.S. Constitution established a federal form of government, in which government powers are shared by the national government and the state governments. Separation of Powers: At the national level, government powers are divided among the legislative, executive, and judicial branches.
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Franklin D. Roosevelt said, “The United States Constitution has proved itself the most marvelously elastic compilation of rules of government ever written.” FDR 32 nd President of the United States
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The Commerce Clause The breadth of the commerce clause: The commerce clause expressly permits Congress to regulate commerce. Over time, courts expansively interpreted this clause, and today the commerce power authorizes the national government, at least theoretically, to regulate virtually every commercial enterprise in the United States.
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The Commerce Clause The regulatory powers of the states: Under their police powers, state governments may regulate private activities to protect or promote the public order, health, safety, morals, and general welfare.
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If state regulations substantially interfere with interstate commerce, they will be held to violate the commerce clause of the U.S. Constitution. Case 4.1
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course BULE 302 taught by Professor Demory during the Spring '10 term at George Mason.

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fall 2008 con law powerpoint - Todays agenda Finish courts...

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