Biodiversity Notes

Biodiversity Notes - Biodiversity Exam Plants Describe the...

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Biodiversity Exam Plants Describe the transition from aquatic green algae to land plants: The adaptation that enabled the transition to land was the development of the sporopollenin. At least one population of green algae had accumulated this trait allowing the first land plant to live permanently above the waterline. Enormous benefits from living out of the water only heightened the evolution of plants from this point forward; unfiltered sunlight, an abundant of CO 2 rich nutrients from the soil, and few herbivores or pathogens. Non-vascular (nontracheophyte) plants - common name examples. How do these differ from the vascular (tracheophyte): Common names: Juniper haircap moss (polytrichum juniperinum). Magnificent moss (plagiomnium ventustum) and Common water moss (fontinalis antipyrentica). Vascular plants have 2 networks of tubes in their roots, stem & leaf where as non vascular plants jack an internal means of water supply/transportation. Non-seed bearing vascular plants - Common-name examples. How do these differ from the seed-bearing plants ? Common names: Liverworts, Mosses and C-ferns. Seed-bearing plants produce microspores (pollen), produce megaspores (seeds) and have water-conserving traits. Conifers (Gymnosperm) and flowering (Angiosperm) plants - Differences between and common name examples. Only flowering plants (angiosperms) have real fruits and flowers. G ymnosperms (such as conifers) are not considered flowering plants and lack real flowers or leaves. Orchids and Poinsettia's are flowering plants and atlantic white-cedar and mountain pine (Pinus mugo) are common names for gymnosperms. Monocot and dicot flowering plants - Differences between and common name examples. Monocots have an embryo w/single cotyledon, pollen w/single furrow or pore and the roots are adventitious where dicots have 2 cotyledons, 3 furrows or pores and roots develop from radicle Fungi Phylum Zygomycota: Distinguishing characteristics and common name examples. Phylum Zygomycota produce cell walls that contain chitin, form hyphae which are
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generally coenocytic because they lack cross walls or septa. The unique character (synapomorphy) of the Zygomycota is the zygospore. Zygospores are formed within a zygosporangium after the fusion of specialized hyphae called gametangia during the sexual cycle. Common names are Merosporangiferous, Phylum Ascomycota: Distinguishing characteristics and common name examples.
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