Exercise _1 - Research

Exercise _1 - Research - English 101 Library Research...

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Unformatted text preview: English 101 Library Research Exercise #1 The purpose of this exercise is to give you practice finding general (e.g. contextual, conceptual, historical, etc) information about your research topic, aspects of your topic, or related subjects in the Mason University Libraries. This phase of the research process is called preliminary research . At this point in time, you should have identified your topic and one or two issues you would like to address. Once you do that, you are ready to initiate your preliminary research at the Fenwick Library. Read and follow these instructions carefully. It may take you between 1 and 3 hours to complete this exercise. Be aware that you may have to repeat the steps in this exercise several times before you finish. As you complete this exercise, observe, discover and take note of the Fenwick Library environment for future reference. This exercise will give you practice • developing and using search statements based on your topic • applying, adjusting and redirecting search strategies as necessary • finding sources at the Reference section of the library • becoming acquainted with the organization of the information and the references your sources provide • practicing summaries 1. Find one or two distinct words that identify the big picture of your topic. For example, if you decided to research the current policies on global warming in the western hemisphere, one distinct word could be “environment”; another “climate”; or sometimes you will need to use a phrase such as “international affairs”. If you choose as a topic the consequences of violence on primetime television, your word could be “media”, or “television”. Alternatively, violence on primetime television, your word could be “media”, or “television”....
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2011 for the course ENG 101 taught by Professor Kimmet during the Spring '07 term at George Mason.

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Exercise _1 - Research - English 101 Library Research...

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