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Chapter 06 - Linux Networking and Security Chapter 6...

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Linux Networking and Security Chapter 6
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Configuring Major Network Services Expand the routing capabilities of your Linux server Set up your own DNS name server Configure a basic email server Understand how Linux can excel as a Web server
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Dynamic Routing with Routing Protocols Static Routing - the routing table in the Linux kernel is assembled by entries in start-up scripts or by user- entered route commands issued to update the routing table Dynamic Routing - the process of using a specialized routing protocol to build and modify routing tables automatically through a network, based on information shared by the routers
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Dynamic Routing with Routing Protocols
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Dynamic Routing with Routing Protocols Interior routing protocols are designed for routing packets among networks within an organization and they route packets based on mathematical models Exterior routing protocols are designed for routing packets between networks controlled by different organizations and they route packets based on administration policies All routing protocols communicate between routers to find the most efficient packet route
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Routing Information Protocol (RIP) and routed RIP, an interior routing protocol, is the oldest routing protocol still in common use on smaller or simply-routed networks RIP defines the best route as that which has the lowest number of routers (hops) to reach the destination network RIP is implemented using the routed daemon, which is easy to configure and run
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Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) and gated OSPF, an interior routing protocol, is designed to work effectively even in very large networks OSPF uses a technique called flooding which allows routers to intelligently construct a chart inside the router that defines the best routing paths OSPF is implemented using the gated daemon, which is not installed by default
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Popular Routing Protocols
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Setting Up a DNS Name Server Domain name service (DNS) is central to the Internet When URLs are entered in a Web browser, a DNS server converts the name to an IP address, allowing the client to send a packet to the Web server as requested The information in DNS can be thought of as an inverted hierarchical tree, where the top of the tree is called root and is represented by a period Users typically don’t refer to roots, but to the last part of domain names called top-level domains
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Setting Up a DNS Name Server
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Setting Up a DNS Name Server
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Setting Up a DNS Name Server Resolving a domain to an IP address using DNS, also called querying the DNS server, stores, or cashes, the conversion information resulting in speedier DNS queries Each domain has a master DNS server which contains database files that provide IP addresses to every host in that domain Each domain should have a slave DNS server which acts as a backup to the master
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Setting Up a Basic Name Server The program that implements a DNS server is called
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