a1 - Logic and Arguments LOGIC: the study of reasoning or...

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Logic and Arguments LOGIC: the study of reasoning or argument. LOGIC (as we will use the term) is the study of how people SHOULD reason or argue. ARGUMENT: a set of statements (or propositions) such that one of the statements is supposed to be supported by the others. PREMISE: a statement in an argument that is intended to help support the conclusion CONCLUSION: the statement in an argument that is supposed to be supported by the premises.
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Deductive and Inductive Arguments Deductive arguments are proofs of their conclusions: the truth of premises is supposed to guarantee the truth of the conclusion. Ex.: 1. All men are mortal. 2. Socrates is a man. ( ) Socrates is mortal. Inductive arguments do not guarantee the truth of the conclusion but are intended to render the conclusion (probably) true on the basis of premises. Ex.: All of the ice we have examined so far is cold. – Therefore, all ice is cold.
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Validity and Soundness Ex.: (P1) 2+2 = 4 (P2) All cats are black. (C) Therefore, our class starts at 8:30 am. Is the argument bad because:
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2011 for the course PHIL 111 taught by Professor Kain during the Spring '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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a1 - Logic and Arguments LOGIC: the study of reasoning or...

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