Intro and History

Intro and History - Welcome to BIO 246 Introduction to...

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Welcome to BIO 246: Introduction to Microbiology for nursing and health sciences majors Dr. Malda Kocache Email:  [email protected] Office hrs: Tues and Thrs 10 – 11:30 a.m. or by  appointment DK rm 3012 Phone: (703) 993-1041
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COURSE INFORMATION Required text Tortora, Funke, and Case. 2010 Microbiology, An  Introduction, 10 th   edition, Addison Wesley Publishers Grading Policy : Three exams worth 25% each, Cumulative final exam counted as 2 regular  exams so 2 sets of 25%. Lowest grade is dropped. Exams will be primarily multiple choice  Exams will be held on the dates assigned. NO MAKE UP EXAMS. Grading scale : 94 – 100% = A+, 90 – 93% = A, 86-89% = B+,80-85% = B, 76-79% = C+, 70-75% = C, 60-69% = D, <60%=F
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COURSE OBJECTIVES To cover the basic principles of microbiology Material to be covered include but not limited to: The differences between  eukaryotic  and  prokaryotic  cells Classification of microorganisms Growth and metabolism of microorganisms The role of microorganisms in diseases Control of microorganisms through anti-microbial agents and  other methodologies Diseases caused by microorganisms
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WHAT IS MICROBIOLOGY? The study of organisms too small to be seen with the unaided  eye  Microscope required to see the organisms Microorganisms, microbes, “germs” Bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa and microalgae Also includes viruses: non cellular entities Unicellular – most consist of one cell Cell  = basic units of structure and function in living things Also involves studying microbes and their relationship to our  lives
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WHY STUDY MICROORGANISMS? Some are involved in infections/diseases ( pathogens ) and food  spoilage Most microorganisms are involved in: Important life cycles Food chains Nitrogen fixation Fermentation and production of certain foods and beverages Genetic engineering Production of antibiotics
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Microbes in Our Lives A few are  pathogenic  (disease-causing)  Decompose organic waste Are producers in the ecosystem by photosynthesis Produce industrial chemicals such as ethanol  and acetone Produce fermented foods such as vinegar, cheese, and bread Produce products used in manufacturing  (e.g., cellulase) and treatment (e.g., insulin)
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MICROORGANISMS ARE…… CRUCIAL BENEFICIAL HARMFUL UBIQUITOUS
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They do cause disease. From cold to AIDS Many emerging new infections ( Swine flu, SARS, Hantavirus, 
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course BIOL 246 taught by Professor Kocache during the Spring '10 term at George Mason.

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Intro and History - Welcome to BIO 246 Introduction to...

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