study guide 4 and 6 - Chapter 4 and 6 study guide Chapter 4...

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Chapter 4 and 6 study guide Chapter 4 - Concepts, Operationalization, and Measurement Introduction conceptualization sets up a foundation for our examination of operationalization and measurement central theme: communication Moving from vague ideas and interests to a completed research report, involves com- munication at every step -- from general ideas to more precise definitions of critical terms. With more precise definitions, we can begin to develop measures to apply in the real world. Conceptions and Concepts Conception - the technical name for those mental images, those sheets of paper in our file drawers Each sheet of paper is a conception -- a subjective thought about things that we en- counter in daily life. There is not way we can directly reveal what is written on our mental images. There we use the terms written in the upper right-hand corners as a way of communicating about our conceptions and the things we observe that are related to those conceptions. Conceptions are subjective We used the words and symbols of language as a way of communicating about our conceptions and the things we observe that are related to those conceptions. Concepts - are the words or symbols in language that we use to represent these men- tal images. Concepts are abstract because they are independent of the labels we assign to them. ex. serious crime is an abstraction, a label we use to represent a concept. However, we must be careful to distinguish the label we use for a concept from the reality that the concept represents. Conceptualization Conceptualization - is the process by which we specify precisely what we mean when we use particular terms. Indicators and Dimensions The end product of conceptualization process is the specification of a set of indicators of what we have in mind, indicating the presence or absence of the concept we are studying. One good indicator of crime seriousness is harm to crime victim. physical injury economic harm psychological harm
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dimension - the technical term for groupings -- some specified aspect of a concept. Thus we might speak of the “victim harm dimension” of crime seriousness. This dimen- sion could include indicators of physical injury, economic loss, or psychological con- sequences. Specifying dimensions and identifying the various indicators for each of those dimen- sions are both parts of conceptualization. Creating Conceptual Order The design and execution of criminal justice research requires that we clear away the confusion over concepts and reality. (real, conceptual, operational) real - is not a stipulation determining the meaning of some expression but a statement of the ‘essential nature’ or the ‘essential attributes’ of some entity. The notion of essen- tial nature is so vague as to render this characterization useless for the purposes of rig- orous inquiry. conceptual definition
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This note was uploaded on 02/07/2011 for the course CRIMINOLOG 202 taught by Professor Meade during the Summer '10 term at South Carolina.

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study guide 4 and 6 - Chapter 4 and 6 study guide Chapter 4...

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