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AHIS Notes - AHISNotes 18:02 KoguryoandJofun

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AHIS Notes 18:02 Koguryo and Jofun Mounded tomb cultures in Korea and Japan Three kingdoms of korea -koguryo: anak tomb no. 3, Pyongyang -Silla: royal tomb, kyongju -Kofun period in Japan -yamato Korea in Three Kingdoms Period (57 BCE – 668 CE) Koguryo, Silla, Paekche Chronology of Koguryo Kingdom 37 BCE founding of state -108 CE founding of the lelang colony by Han China 313 CE defeat of the lelang colony 391-531 succession of able kings (kwanggaeto, Changsu) led to expansion in  territory 427 CE removal of capital from Chip-an to Pyongyang 610,612 CE Invasions by Sui dynasty of China
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668 CE defeated by Silla and tang China Anak Tomb no. 3, dated 357, 4 th  century, S of Pyongyang, Hwanghae namdo There are hundreds of them but no. 3 is what we will study Mounded Tombs O Originated in china of late eastern zhou (c. 4 th  century BCE) Consisted of ceremonial structures above man-made mounds, and  subterranean structures made of wood, bricks, or stone Interior furnished with burial goods and painted murals Mounded tomb structures -the koguryo model: horizontal, multi-chambered; accessible -the silla model: “stone-surround wooden chamber;” inaccessible Tongsu – an ex-general from the state of Yan in china Chronoly of Silla Kindgom 57 BCE founding of saro around kyongju c350 CE rise of Kim clas (goldsmiths) 417-458 Introduction of Buddhism under King Mulji 562 Conquest of kaya region 660 conquest of paekche 668 Conquest of koguryo and unification of Korean peninsula under King Munmu Royal Tombs of Silla
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-located  Kofun Japan (c. 300-700) “old tomb” culture spread from nara basin eastward -rise of the Yamato -extensive contact with Korea (paekche) Tomb of King Nintoku -located near Osaka, Japan, 5 th  century CE “keyhole” layout Haniwa -Haniwa, “circle of clay” refers to clay cylinders and sculptures places around a  tomb mound; not burial goods Functions: to strengthen tomb exterior; to emarcate a “spirit path” to protect the  dead Earlier example in kansai area (nara, Osaka) Later examples in Kanto area (Tokyo) Week 4 object 1 -expert gold makers-specialty of the Silla people comparisons: two tiered dark cylinder thing = bronze vessel, about 113 BCE, water jar/basin,  weird egg shaped dark thing with figures upon it =  Key term: Lacquer- part tree stump, sap comes from tree and after purifying it through  boiling you can add color pigments and apply liquid to piece High status as it is an expensive medium Ritual connotations = used for luxury not a ritual item Bronze pan vessel
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Second part of AHIS 18:02 Early India and Buddhism
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Second part of AHIS 18:02
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2011 for the course AHIS 125g at USC.

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AHIS Notes - AHISNotes 18:02 KoguryoandJofun

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