Astro Chapter 2 Notes

Astro Chapter 2 Notes - Astronomy Chapter 2 Notes...

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Astronomy Chapter 2 Notes Positional astronomy – the study of positions of objects in the sky and how these positions change On modern day charts, the entire sky is divided into 88 regions, each called constellations (group of stars) Diurnal motion –when you see stars that were just rising in the east when the night began are now low in the western sky. This daily motion of the stars is diurnal motion because the earth rotates. The same constellations rise in the east and set in the west. The earth rotates from west to east, making one complete rotation every 24 hours, which is why there is a daily cycle of day and night. Because of this rotation, stars appear to us to rise in the east and set in the west, as do the Sun and the Moon. In addition to diurnal motion, the constellations visible in the night sky also change slowly over the course of a year. This happens because the Earth orbits or revolves around the Sun. Celestial sphere- earth at its center Celestial equator- divides the sky into northern and southern hemispheres The north and south celestial poles are where the earth’s axis of rotation intersects the celestial sphere The point in the sky directly overhead an observer anywhere on earth is called the observer’s zenith. Stars near the north celestial pole revolve around the pole, never rising or setting. Such stars are called
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2011 for the course PHYSICS 109 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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Astro Chapter 2 Notes - Astronomy Chapter 2 Notes...

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