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Final Project Mitigation Strategies and Solutions Robert Reep

Final Project Mitigation Strategies and Solutions Robert Reep

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Final Project Mitigation Strategies and Solutions 1 Mitigation Strategies and Solutions Robert Reep August 22, 2010 SCI/275 Sandra Flemming
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Final Project Mitigation Strategies and Solutions 2 The Picoides borealis is a woodpecker native to South Carolina as well as other southern states from Texas to the coast of South Carolina. This woodpecker was described for the first time in 1807 by the naturalist Vieillot who went on to name the woodpecker as Picus borealis. In 1810 Alexander Wilson gave the Picus borealis the common name used today, the red-cockaded woodpecker. Cockade comes from Wilson’s time and was a common term for an ornament or ribbon worn on a hat as a badge. Wilson used this term because the adult males had a small red patch between the white cheek patch and the black crown on the head. The red patch is the only visible difference between the male and female (Chadwick, 2006). The red-cockaded woodpeckers are one of the smallest woodpeckers in the southern part of the United States; the adult averages seven to nine inches and weighs about 1.4 to 1.9 ounces. These birds were one of the first species to make the endangered list in 1970 and were provided protection by the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (Chadwick, 2006). These woodpeckers live as groups of about six birds that consist of one female and one breeding male. The remainder of the group are usually male and are helpers. The breeding pairs are monogamous and raise one brood a year (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, n.d.). The red-cockaded woodpecker uses mature pine forests for its home and prefers longleaf (Pinus palustris) pine trees however other species of pines are acceptable. Unlike all other woodpeckers they make their cavities in living pines exclusively (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services, 2010). Once contiguous across large areas, the southern pine ecosystems were ideal for the growth and stability of the red-cockaded woodpecker.
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