Lecture 3 - NTRN 201 A Good Diet Needs to be Adequate in...

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NTRN 201
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A Good Diet Needs to be: Adequate in nutrients, Offer a variety of foods, Supply adequate calories, & Be moderate in empty calorie food choices
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Empty Calories vs. Nutrient Dense Foods Nutrient Density: determines its nutritional quality. “The ratio derived by dividing a food’s nutrient content by its calorie content. When its contribution to our need for that nutrient exceeds its contribution to our calorie need, the food is considered to have a favorable nutrient density.” (text pg 37)
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Comparison of Nutrient Density
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Energy Density A comparison of the kcal content of a food with the weight of the food. See pg 38 in text
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Consume a variety of foods balanced by moderate intake of each food. “choose a number of different foods within any given food group rather than eating the ‘same old thing’ day after day”
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Functional Foods Food that provide health benefits beyond those supplied by the traditional nutrients it contains. Fruits & Vegetables offer a rich supply of phytochemicals (plant chemicals) See pg 36 in text for tips in boosting phytochemicals
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5 major food groups: Grains Vegetables Fruit Dairy Protein
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STATES OF NUTRITIONAL HEALTH Desirable Nutrition : Malnutrition : Undernutrition : Overnutrition : subclinical deficiency toxicity clinical symptoms
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Measuring Nutritional Status ABCDE Method A nthropometric measurements Height Weight Body skinfolds Body circumferences B iochemical assessment Blood and urine lab tests C linical Examinations Physical exam & observations D iet assessment Usual intake and associated habits examined E conomic assessment
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Subclinical Symptoms Clinical Symptoms
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Recommendations for Food Choices Guidelines for Planning Healthy Diets
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The USDA Food Guide Pyramid was revised and introduced on April 19, 2005.
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For young children:
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Published in the January 2008 issue of the Journal of Nutrition, the Modified MyPyramid for Older Adults (>70 years old) stresses that older people should be careful to get enough fiber, calcium and vitamins D and B-12. It also emphasizes the importance of regular exercise and adequate fluid intake.
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My Pyramid represents the recommended proportion of foods from each food group focuses on the importance of making smart food choices in every food group, every day Illustrates Personalization , Gradual improvement , Physical activity , Variety , Moderation , Proportionality utilizes interactive technology
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