Lecture 4 - - Continued NTRN 201 DRIs (Dietary Reference...

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- Continued NTRN 201
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DRI’s (Dietary Reference Intakes) and RDA (Recommended Dietary Allowances): Designed to meet the needs of practically all healthy people in our population of similar age and gender Intended mainly for diet planning Estimated minimum requirements Not set for all KNOWN nutrients
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DRI’s (Dietary Reference Intakes) Combines all 8 volumes of the DRIs summarized in one reference volume, organized by nutrient, which reviews function in the body, food sources, usual dietary intakes, and effects of deficiencies and excessive intakes.
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Nutrient RDA/DRI vs. Energy RDA
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Views of “Optimal” Nutrient Intake
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Standards Under the DRI
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DRIs = Dietary Reference Intakes Minimum Requirement for Health AMDR = Acceptable Macronutrient Distribution Ranges http://www.iom.edu/CMS/3788/4574/45105.aspx
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Daily Reference Values = DRV or DV (Daily Value) Standards used for food labeling See Appendix B in text
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The Exchange System Designed for control of diabetes or those who want to control calories and distribution of protein, carbohydrate and fat intake. See Appendices D in text
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Food Composition Tables Provides specific analysis of foods Used in NutritionCalc 3.0 USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/foodcomp/search/
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Unified Guidelines : Endorsed by the American Heart Assn., American Cancer Society, American Dietetic Assn., American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Institutes of Health Eat a variety of foods. Choose most of the foods that you eat from plant sources. Eat five or more servings of fruit and vegetables each day. Eat six or more servings of bread, cereals, pasta and/or rice per day. Limit intake of high-fat foods, particularly those from animal
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course EMSE 103 taught by Professor Ggh during the Spring '10 term at Case Western.

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Lecture 4 - - Continued NTRN 201 DRIs (Dietary Reference...

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