Lecture 8 - Protein NTRN 201 Sources of Protein text pg 194...

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Protein NTRN 201
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Sources of Protein text: pg. 194
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Protein Our bodies are approximately 1/5 th protein . It is distributed between: – blood proteins 10% – fat cells 3 - 4%, – body skin 9 - 9.5%, – bones 18 - 19%, – muscles 46 - 47% Protein requirements depend upon body size, age, gender, and physiological conditions.
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DRI for Protein
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The DRI for Protein is: • IBW in kg. X 0.8 gm. Protein – (see text - pg. 205 for calculation) Example: IBW of 150# divided by 2.2 = 68.2 kg. 68.2 kg x 0.8 gm. = 54.5 grams of protein needed per day.
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An Amino Acid West Publishing Co.
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Amino Acids *The asterisk denotes the central carbon West Publishing Co.
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Complete Protein A complete protein: – " high biological value " Incomplete proteins:
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Formation of a Dipeptide • Tripeptide = 3 amino acids (a.a.) • Oligopeptide = 4 – 10 a.a. • Polypeptide = many a.a. (>10) West Publishing Co.
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Coiling and Folding of a Protein Molecule West Publishing Co.
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Enzyme Action West Publishing Co.
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When protein is subjected to heat, acid, bases, alcohol, salts of heavy metals , or other conditions that disturb its stability, it uncoils or changes shape. Denaturation
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course EMSE 103 taught by Professor Ggh during the Spring '10 term at Case Western.

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Lecture 8 - Protein NTRN 201 Sources of Protein text pg 194...

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