6305_chap10 - Chapter 10 Solid Solution Precipitation and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 10 Solid Solution, Precipitation, and Dispersion Strengthening
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The two basic forms of solid solutions. (a) Substitutional solid solution of zinc in copper to form brass. (b) Interstitial solid solution of carbon in iron to form steel. The interstitial solid-solution carbon atoms are shown in the face-centered cubic form of iron. Forms of Solid Solution
Background image of page 2
(a) Increase in strength,  σ , of steel as a function of content of solute. The solid lines represent substitutional solute additions, while the dashed line represents interstitial solute additions. (After F. B. Pickering and T. Gladman, ISI Special Report 81, Iron and Steel  Inst ., (London: 1963), p. 10). (b) Increase in strength of sapphire (monocrystalline alumina) with small additions of chromium at 1400  C (Adapted from K. P. D. Lagerlof, B. J. Pletka, T. E. Mitchell, and A. H. Heuer,  Radiation Effects , 74 (1983) 87.) 7 Solid Solution Strengthening
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
(a) Positions of interstitial atoms in the cube. (b) i Carbon atom shown as a producer of a tetragonal distortion. Positions of Interstitial Atoms in the Cubic Lattice
Background image of page 4
( r θ )-coordinates of a solute atom in the strain field of an edge dislocation. Elastic Interactions
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
(a) Schematic stress–strain curve of an annealed low-carbon steel showing the yield-point phenomenon. (b) y Low-carbon steel in a temper-rolled condition and annealed for one hour between 100  C and 34.3  C). (Courtesy of R. Foley.) R Mechanical Effect Associated with Solid Solutions: Yield Point Formation
Background image of page 6
iron consisting of an edge dislocation and a row of  carbon atoms. Cottrell Atmosphere in Iron
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course EMSE 103 taught by Professor Ggh during the Spring '10 term at Case Western.

Page1 / 28

6305_chap10 - Chapter 10 Solid Solution Precipitation and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online