AED 200 Final Project

AED 200 Final Project - RELIGION IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 1...

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RELIGION IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 1 Religion in Public Schools Mary E. Spurlin AED/200 October 24, 2010 Dr. Maloney Hunter-Lowe
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RELIGION IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 2 Religion in Public Schools Thomas Jefferson, one of the founding fathers, stated that the First Amendment erected a “wall of separation” between church and state (Mount, 2010). However, it seems that more than ever the debate of including religious material in public school curriculum is a becoming prominent issue. Although religion is a formidable part of the lives of many people, including it in the public school system could have negative consequences and could require the teachers and schools to spend more time and money. Therefore, religion does not belong in the public school system. Religious education could leave students feeling alienated or bullied by peers In the world, there are more than 20 major religions, including Christianity, Judaism, Shinto, and Scientology (Adherents, 2007). Fairly representing them all would be a very daunting task for a teacher and school system to undertake and the lack of equal representation could have negative consequences. Many people believe that incorporating religion into daily curriculum could be a good way to teach students to tolerate each other and respect what makes them all different. However, the reality is that being different is not always viewed as a positive part of society and can create serious problems. Many students could ban together and bully those whose beliefs are different from them. Seeing something different as a threat, they could use a variety of verbal and physical forms of abuse, making the targeted students feel out casted and uncomfortable. If a student does not feel safe or comfortable in his or her learning environment he or she may not to able to learn and take full advantage of educational opportunities. When teaching religion, teachers also have to be aware of including information about every known religion because if they do not they can be perceived to be forcing a majoritarian view. Students being raised with no faith or religion are especially susceptible to
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RELIGION IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 3 being alienated because learning about religion in school can make them feel very insecure about their home lives or they can feel pressured to conform to the majority to feel accepted (Anti- Defamation League, 2010). Religious education may not foster the feelings of tolerance and acceptance that many believe it will. Risking the comfort or safety of students within the classroom for the sake of including religious education may not be a wise decision. Religious education and school prayer have been deemed unconstitutional Over the years, the debate of including religion and prayer in the public school system has become a major issue for the court system. Many cases have been argued concerning religion and prayer in schools and multiple times the Supreme Court ruled against those wishing to include religion and prayer in the school system. In the groundbreaking cases
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course AED 200 taught by Professor Daniels during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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AED 200 Final Project - RELIGION IN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 1...

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