HUM 205 Final Project

HUM 205 Final Project - TIME TRAVELING ART HISTORIAN 1 Time...

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TIME TRAVELING ART HISTORIAN 1 Time Traveling Art Historian Mary E. Spurlin HUM/205 October 24, 2010 Stephanie Sandifer
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TIME TRAVELING ART HISTORIAN 2 Time Traveling Art Historian As a world-renown art historian I have seen and analyzed some of the most spectacular and famous pieces of art work from numerous time periods. With the ability to travel through time, there are some eras in history that I will visit and analyze. I have chosen to travel to the ancient Egyptian civilization, the Italian Renaissance, and the early 20 th century where I will study the culture and the most definitive pieces of artwork of those times. The ability to document my firsthand experiences with these cultures and works of art will further my understanding of what happened during these historic civilizations and how the culture is reflected in the art. Ancient Egypt and the Great Pyramids Traveling back to the civilization of the Nile I had many assumptions of what it would be like to walk amongst the ancient Egyptians and revel in their artistic abilities. Upon arriving, I realized how optimistic this dynamic culture was. With the strong flowing waters of the Nile, the ancient Egyptians could establish a permanent agricultural society and have a better irrigation system (Benton & DiYanni, 2008). The vast deserts that surrounded Egypt eliminated the fears of invasion and the Old Kingdom was a time of political and social stability (Benton & DiYanni, 2008). The Great Pyramids at Giza are the best representation of this strong and secure culture. Standing in front of this stunning example of architecture, I began to feel an oneness with this culture and a better understanding of what they wanted to convey. Although the Great Pyramids at Giza were commissioned by the Pharaohs as a final resting place, they stood for much more. Built from limestone and cut from metal tools, the pyramids are a shining example of the respect the ancient Egyptians had for the afterlife and their leaders (Benton & DiYanni, 2008). The Pharaoh was seen as living a God and the pyramids were used to reunite him with the other Gods
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TIME TRAVELING ART HISTORIAN 3 upon death. His power was a result of his divinity and the largeness of the pyramids represents his immense authority (Hooker, 1996). The mathematical precision used to create these structures, aligning the three Pyramids at Giza so the corners face north, south, east, and west, is physical proof of this society’s extraordinary engineering accomplishments (Benton & DiYanni, 2008). The geometric setting also shows order, balance, and rationality, which are important values within this culture and personified by the kings and the pyramids (Hooker, 1996). They also embodied the values of this entire culture because they represented the firm beliefs that the people had in their almighty gods and their journey in the afterlife. Death was not something to be feared but something to welcome and prepare for. This was a common theme for a majority of
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HUM 205 Final Project - TIME TRAVELING ART HISTORIAN 1 Time...

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