SUM10Research_MAN5055_ONeal

SUM10Research_MAN5055_ONeal - Brendan ONeal MAN 5055 Dr....

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Brendan O’Neal MAN 5055 Dr. Ehart Hodges University
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Abstract This paper takes a look at the current Facility Expansion Project (FEP) in the City of Cape Coral, Florida. The facility expansion has been in progress for longer than projected and over budget. The project is of debatable ethical fabric, lined with controversial contracting methods, at times, questionable financial practices, and its immediate completion is of questionable need. The project is continuously under scrutiny due to the price, the scope, and the current economic climate of Southwest Florida. It is up to the citizens of the City of Cape Coral to decide if the continuation of the project is justified under the current membership of the city council and it is city council’s job to produce justification to the residents of the city that the project is fiscally responsible and in the city’s current best interest.
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Introduction The purpose of this research is to analyze and research some of the issues that the City of Cape Coral’s Facility Expansion Plan faces. According to the city’s website, the City of Cape Coral was founded about 50 years ago and it is a pre-platted community with nearly 400 miles of dredged canals (City of Cape Coral, 2010). Cape Coral has the third largest city (in area) in the State of Florida at 115 square miles. It is only behind Jacksonville and Tampa in size. Cape Coral is the 12 th most populous city in the state (City of Cape Coral, 2010). Founded by the Rosen brothers, the land was marketed as the city with the most waterfront property and sold to mostly out of state owners (City of Cape Coral, 2010). As mentioned, the city was pre-platted; the typical lot is 40ft x 120ft. The population of the city is growing rapidly and is forecast to double its current population of 165,000 residents in the next 30 years (City of Cape Coral, 2010). The city will be able to support about 400,00 people at maximum capacity. As a relatively young and growing city, the City of Cape Coral is experiencing growing pains; this finds the city in need of undertaking facility’s expansion (City of Cape Coral, 2010). The city is in need of having a utility system in place that is able to support its population explosion. Since its inception in the 1950s, the city was reliant on well water; relying on
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well water became problematic because in populous areas, the wells would begin to run dry in high demand areas (City of Cape Coral, 2010). These issues and state law called for the city to implement a “centralized potable water system”. Water quality problems began in the 1980s and still impact the city today. In 2005 the city council approved a five-year plan in regards to expansion of the utilities; this plan is to be reviewed annually and amended as needed. In 2007, city council approved an independent study of wastewater collection alternatives. The city’s plan for handling this facility’s expansion have evolved since the 1980s, and continue to evolve as the need
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course MAN 5055 taught by Professor Kest during the Spring '10 term at Hodges University.

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SUM10Research_MAN5055_ONeal - Brendan ONeal MAN 5055 Dr....

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