George B Graen_Article-DB26-1

George B Graen_Article-DB26-1 - Retrieved from Proquest on...

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Retrieved from Proquest on 4/30/05 - http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb? index=0&sid=2&srchmode=1&vinst=PROD&fmt=3&startpage=- You may pull the original if you have problems reading this text. See the Library for help. Individual self-management: Analysis of professionals' self-managing activities in functional and cross-functional work teams mary Uhl-Bien , George B Graen . Academy of Management Journal . Briarcliff Manor: Jun 1998.Vol. 41, Iss. 3; pg. 340, 11 pgs Subjects: Teams, Studies, Comparative analysis, Professionals, Self directed work teams, Organizational behavior Classification Codes 9130, 2500 Author(s): mary Uhl-Bien, George B Graen Publication title: Academy of Management Journal. Briarcliff Manor: Jun 1998. Vol. 41, Iss. 3; pg. 340, 11 pgs Source type: Periodical ISSN/ISBN: 00014273 ProQuest document ID: 32777261 Text Word Count 6306 Document URL: http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=32777261&sid=2&Fmt=3&clie Abstract (Document Summary) A comparative analysis of professionals' use of individual self-managing activities in functional and cross-functional units found that individual self-management was beneficial for effectiveness in functional units but not in cross-functional units. The study also explored the effects of interactions of individual self-management and unit type on team members' overall levels of job satisfaction and perceptions of bureaucratic obstacles. Results suggest a need for a contingency model of self- management and a need to pursue the multidimensionality of the self-management construct. Full Text (6306 words) Copyright Academy of Management Jun 1998 [Headnote] A comparative analysis of professionals' use of individual self-managing activities in functional and cross- functional units found that individual self-management was beneficial for effectiveness in functional units but not in cross-functional units. The study also explored the effects of interactions of individual self- management and unit type (functional or cross-functional) on team members' overall levels of job satisfaction and perceptions of bureaucratic obstacles. Results suggest a need for a contingency model of self-management and a need to pursue the multidimensionality of the selfmanagement construct. Research interest in self-management has increased in recent years because of the inferred practical usefulness of self-management models for sustaining organizational competitiveness (Hackman, 1986; Mohrman & Cummings, 1989). Walton (1985) identified self-management as critical for competitive advantage in contemporary markets because of its emphasis on employee commitment rather than on control-oriented approaches to management. This commitment comes from self, not external (e.g.,
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boss), control over behavior (Luthans & Davis, 1979). Self-managing individuals are responsible for determining approaches to task execution as well as for monitoring and managing their own behaviors
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This note was uploaded on 01/30/2011 for the course MAN 5226 taught by Professor Kest during the Spring '10 term at Hodges University.

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George B Graen_Article-DB26-1 - Retrieved from Proquest on...

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