MKT230 week6

MKT230 week6 - LifeCycleManagementPage1 Assignment Life...

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  Life Cycle Management     Page 1 Assignment Life Cycle Management Analysis YOUR NAME Axia College of University of Phoenix
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  Life Cycle Management     Page 2 On April 2, 2007 the Apple iPod made headlines when “Apple sold its 100 millionth iPod, far outpacing its closest competitors, which have failed to make even a dent in the portable music player's popularity (InformationWeek, 2007, para.1). Apple’s success does not stop with the iPod. In fact, “in February [2006] the iTunes Music Store sold its billionth song; that milestone is all the more impressive when you remember that Apple has numerous competitors in the digital music world” (Leonard, 2006, p. 54). In this paper the Apple iPod’s product life cycle will be analyzed by incorporating information concerning the product’s objectives and marketing strategies, the introduction phase, growth stage, and the maturity stage impacts. Apple’s product objectives, concerning the iPod, are based on product quality. From quality of sound, ease to use, reliability, product safety, to any other benefit the consumers yearn for, Apple succeeds. Apple's strategy: Focus on making the best product, and rewards will follow. Apple makes little pretense of building a level playing field; rather than aim for the most partners, Apple focuses on attracting the best ones. As a result, the Mac and iPod feel more like a gated, community, with Apple keeping close watch over who gets in. "The stereotype is that they're this loosey-goosey company, nothing could be further from the truth," says Gary Johnson, the former CEO of chipmaker PortalPlayer Inc., which roared to prosperity by providing the electronic brains of the first generations of iPods. Johnson says that whenever a project fell off track or a part fell short of Apple's needs, its engineers were demanding "root cause analysis" and explanations within 12 hours. In October 2001 Apple Inc. launched the five gigabyte iPod and in March 2002 the 10 gigabyte iPod was introduced(Mac Tracker, 2007). The iPod was not the first MP3 player on the market, Iomega's HipZip, the Rio, and Creative Lab's Nomad already existed. Instead, the iPod addressed the other products inadequacies. Business Week Online put the four MP3 players to the test and concluded:
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  Life Cycle Management     Page 3 The HipZip ($299), while tiny, is underpowered, holding only 80 minutes of music on a 40- megabyte disk. The Nomad ($400) has a built-in hard drive that can hold more songs than the iPod, but it's barely portable. The thing [Nomad] is bulky and its hard drive runs like molasses. The Rio ($179.95) [is] clumsy and buggy. All three [competitors] are slow in
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MKT230 week6 - LifeCycleManagementPage1 Assignment Life...

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